Most Dangerous Dogs in the World (2021)

What makes one dog breed get a reputation for being more dangerous than others? Should you be more cautious around specific breeds? And does a dog’s breed even matter, or is it always a case of bad training?

Let’s explore some of the world’s most dangerous dogs together. You’ll also learn about what makes us think of certain dog breeds as dangerous. Additionally, we’ll cover the role and history of dog training in building these reputations.

Dangerous Dogs (by Design?)

There are a number of reasons people tend to think of certain dog breeds as more dangerous than others. Not all reasons are valid in the same way: Some are hard statistics, others are personal experiences. But they all can play an important role in our understanding of these animals and our discussion about what might make some more dangerous than others.

Here are some of the reasons we tend to consider certain dogs to be the most dangerous dog breeds:

Reasons for (Perceived) Dangerousness

  • There are more reported incidences of dog bites and serious injuries from some breeds. This is one of the big reasons some municipalities consider Pit Bulls the most dangerous dog, even requiring special insurance if you want to have one in some areas.
  • The sheer size of some breeds can increase that perceived “danger factor.” Many of the largest breeds actually have very calm temperaments. Their danger has to do with the potential for more serious injuries if those dogs happen to attack or even accidentally injure someone.
  • Some dogs give us a feeling of danger because they were literally designed to instill it over the course of history. For example, we’re used to seeing German Shepherds used as police dogs. We’re used to seeing breeds such as Rottweilers and Doberman Pinschers being trained as guard dogs. And we’re used to stories of American Pit Bull Terriers being trained for dog fighting.
  • Another big thing that affects our opinions of dog breeds is our personal experience with them. Similarly, anecdotal stories we hear from others can affect us. They may have had either positive or negative experiences with certain types of dogs.

Let’s focus more on that last reason, as I believe it can have the most impact.

Beware of the Dog Sign
Credit: Mandee Sears (via Flickr)

How Our Personal Experiences Affect Our Views of Dog Breeds

Whether it’s right or wrong for us to judge a dog breed based on our limited experiences and the stories we hear about them, it’s something most of us do on some level (myself included). So I’d like to share some personal stories and how they’ve affected me (or not affected me, though you might think it should have).

We saw this in your comments on the original list. For example, we had people saying Pit Bulls aren’t dangerous because their own experiences with the breed have been pleasant. Others shared experiences on the other side of the spectrum.

Personally, I come in somewhere in the middle. I’m not naive enough to think that breed alone makes all pit bulls dangerous or more vicious than other dogs. But I’m also not naive enough to ignore the evidence that this breed has a history of causing more frequent and more serious injuries than most, if not all, others.

Clearly the breed plays some role. Some breeds lean toward different temperaments, or have different loyalties. These might make them great with their own families but naturally suspicious of strangers or other animals or even small children, who have less self-restraint than adults.

My Brother’s Pit Bull Encounter

Personal experience is also a factor, though. My brother has a small dog. He took the dog outside at his apartment building into the parking lot. Another neighbor was outside with their Pit Bull. It wasn’t on a leash (while this is a requirement, going unleashed isn’t terribly uncommon around here). By all measures the dog would have seemed like a normal, calm family pet.

Until it saw my brother’s dog.

It immediately charged at them and grabbed his dog by the throat. There was no provocation, no unusual noise, and they were across the lot — not close to the pit bull’s owner in any way. My brother was able to rescue his dog by lifting the Pit Bull and literally prying its mouth open (which, by the way, is a stupid thing to do — please don’t ever follow that example). The dog let go and his dog was okay after being treated for its injuries. The Pit Bull then latched onto my brother’s arm though. Again, he was okay after being treated, but the wound wasn’t insignificant. It could have been far worse.

My Take on Breed vs. Training

That puts me in that middle ground territory I mentioned before. Personal experience with this breed is terrible. There was no warning sign that the owner trained this dog to attack or fight. In fact, the aggression caught its owner completely off-guard. It just snapped at the sight of a smaller dog. That kind of sudden reaction is far from unheard of with this breed.

But that said, I don’t fault an entire breed (in the case of Pit Bulls, actually three different breeds) for the actions of that single dog. The lack of predictability of some breeds would make them “more dangerous” in my view. But the same goes for poor training and bad behavior by an owner (like allowing any breed with known issues with children or other animals to run free without a leash).

This is far from the only example I could give. Saint Bernards are also sometimes cited as some of the most dangerous dogs. But they’re also known for being calm-tempered and being good with kids. It’s their fierce loyalty that can be an issue.

Guard and Danger

A family member had one years ago. That dog was a great dog for most of its life. It even helped to stop a burglar in the family’s building. But years later it lunged at another family member who the dog knew for its entire life. They came to visit, and out of the blue the dog lunged and went for her eye. She’s still terrified of the breed to this day (and understandably so after an experience like that).

We can’t explain the unprovoked attack. It might have been a breeding issue. The dog might have been having a bad day in some way. We just don’t know. I understand her fear of the breed. But it’s not one I hold myself as a result — perhaps because I didn’t see it first-hand.

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Some people find my dog’s underbite to be intimidating. But I know this is just her smiling after eating her favorite treat (with crumbs still all over her face and the floor). But even happy pups can be dangerous in their own ways.

I personally own a mixed breed dog — Border Collie mixed with a Lab. At this stage in her life, I would also consider her to be a dangerous dog, especially around children. She is in no way violent. She’s great with cats and other dogs.

Why my Dog Isn’t Harmless

She’s still at that point where she’s young, wants to play all the time, and she doesn’t realize her own size or strength. The hyper aspect is specific to breeds. Both Labs and Border Collies can be very high strung, especially in their first couple of years.

Neighbors and family members don’t want her playing with their tiny dogs, and I think that’s understandable. And I wouldn’t take her out to play with small children for fear that she’d accidentally hurt them by jumping up or knocking them over as she tries to play. Being dangerous isn’t always a case of being naturally vicious, and that’s why so much falls onto the owner. It’s our responsibility to make sure our dogs aren’t put into situations where they’re more likely to cause harm.

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It’s this little guy that my guests should be most concerned about. He can be more vicious than any dog I’ve personally known. He mauled the last stranger who tried to rub that tummy (never, ever, ever pet an animal you don’t know without asking the owner first; she tried even after being warned).

How About Your Experiences?

If you’ve had experiences that have shaped your own views of what makes for a dangerous dog breed, let us know in the comments. Tell us what happened and whether or not you think it’s a fair way to judge a larger group of dogs based on the action (or actions) you’ve seen first-hand, and why.

Now let’s get to our original list of some of the seemingly most dangerous dogs, based on breeds. Now that you know why certain breeds have earned their “most dangerous dogs” reputations, can you think of others that might also have a similar history? Tell us in the comments.

Every person that I know deeply cares about his or her pets. They are their best friends. They tenderly love each other. Sometimes they eat together, sleep together, and go for walks together.

I’m more of a cat person, but I can’t sit still when I see little puppies or big dogs with big soft fur. I want to hug them, play with them, and give them some of my love and tenderness too. I’ve also seen many adult dogs of different breeds worth praise and true admiration. They are clever, sociable, and funny when you want to play; calm and patient with kids.

And they’re something I can’t credit cats with: They are faithful.

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The Human Influence

Personally, I don’t know any dog that would bite without warning or just snap. It’s my firm belief that behavior of the dog doesn’t depend on its breed so much as it being the right training and the “master” that matter. In my opinion, humans are most often responsible for dangerous dogs. That said, there might be some truth in the idea that some breeds have more unstable temperaments than others. Knowing this, we should never provoke them.

Think for a minute and analyze your own life. Are we always polite? I can think of several situations when I would have gladly slapped a man in the face, but thank God I’m weak enough and I can control myself (at least I think that I can). Now think about animals. They have instincts too, and they may forget about good manners. It’s not as if they understand them in the same ways we do.

It’s also important for dog owners to protect both other people and their dogs from unexpected circumstances and thus the unpleasant situations. For example, when going outside, they could always use a dog-lead and a muzzle. They could be careful and not let the dog play on its own without a leash, especially when there are other people around. When you have a dog, you become forever responsible for the animal you’ve trained and tamed.

Why I Wrote This List

In any case, it’s good to know what breeds of dogs might be most dangerous, just to keep yourself safe. Sometimes the danger in a dog isn’t even a nasty personality, but a matter of them not knowing their own strength.

Even though I personally still find it hard to believe that breed alone determines whether a dog is “dangerous,” you never know what a dog’s owner has taught it. Reliable research into the most dangerous dogs included below comes from the American Veterinary Medical Association, the CDC, and the Humane Society of the United States.

We’ll start with least dangerous of the bunch. Sorry, but there won’t be any terrifying photos today.

Read Also: Ready for a Dog? What Breed?

Dalmatian

Origin: Croatia, Middle Ages
Weight: 40-70 lbs
Height: 20-24 inches

Dalmatians are active and energetic dogs, and love to be outdoors. They are very playful and love running.

There’s still no definite info about what this breed was originally bred for. What is known is that it is the oldest spotted breed in Europe, Asia and Africa. They were serving as warriors, hunters, and shepherds long before finally becoming the symbol of the US fireman.

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Boxer

Origin: Germany, 1850s
Weight: 50-64 lbs
Height: 20-25 inches

The boxer is a very strong “square” dog. Boxers love to walk, but the owner should never forget the leash. It’s also better to refrain from aggressive games. Still, boxers recognize all members of the family and can play well with the children.

The boxer breed has its origins in feudal Germany and dates back to the line of bulldogs that existed in Europe in the 16th century. These ancestors lived for hunting wild boars and other big wild animals. The first puppy in the new breed received the name “Box”. Boxer’s qualities, such as their strength, were highly valued by farmers and shopkeepers.

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Presa Canario

Origin: Canary Islands, Africa, 18th century
Weight: 100-125 lbs
Height: 25-26 inches

The Presa Canario hails from the Canary Islands. Dogs of this breed had two jobs: Hunting – and war. During the 18th century, English traders and merchants came to the Canary Islands, bringing with them their working and gladiator dogs, notably the Mastiff of England and the bulldog. Englishmen also brought with them their traditions of pit fighting for which their breeds and the island dogs were inevitably mixed and eventually bred to produce the ultimate fighter. Nowadays the breed finds use in guarding, handling, and driving cattle.

The dogs of this breed can be gentle and noble with their families, showing great affection to their owners, but are highly suspicious of strangers.

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Saint Bernard

Origin: Switzerland, Middle Ages
Weight: 110-180 lbs
Height: 24-29 inches

Saint Bernards are amazingly big and easygoing dogs, but due to their impressive size they can look a bit awkward. They are quiet and peaceful, love children, and are not inclined to active and rapid games. A Saint Bernard will need all of your attention, so if you spend days in the office, this dog is not for you. They are tremendously strong and, of course, they require a good bit of space.

Most likely, the ancestor of the Saint Bernard was the Alpine Mastiff, a pretty aggressive breed. The original Saint Bernards were working dogs and scouts. They were also much calmer than their Mastiff ancestors. For that reason, they make for excellent home companions today.

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Great Dane

Origin: Germany, Middle Ages to 19th century
Weight: 90-120 lbs
Height: 27-32 inches

Great Danes are beautiful and majestic animals, with a gentle and loving nature. They love to play with children and participate in all family events and activities, especially in the outdoors. They are happy to go for a walk and don’t mind the company of other dogs. Despite their gigantic size, Great Danes can even feel quite at home in a city.

In the Middle Ages, these dogs earned their living in dog fighting and by hunting big mammals.

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Chow Chow

Origin: China, Antiquity
Weight: 40-65 lbs
Height: 18-22 inches

The chow chow is an independent dog often focused only on its own needs. Chow chows need constant physical activity and communication, even if they don’t seem to like being disturbed much.

The chow chow’s original purposes were hunting and helping shepherds.

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Doberman Pinscher

Origin: Germany, 19th century
Weight: 65-90 lbs
Height: 26-28 inches

Doberman Pinschers (often just called Dobermans) are dogs whose traits emphasize protecting and defending instincts. It is important to avoid any type of aggressive play and struggle with these dogs. Instead, use the games to develop the Doberman’s intelligence. Even though they aren’t small dogs, Dobermans can adapt to life in a city and become a perfect companion for an experienced, physically active owner.

This breed has its roots in in Germany. The breeder Louis Doberman decided to combine the qualities of guard dogs and and the terrier. Luis was a policeman, and so saw the need for a dog that would devotedly defend its owner.

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Alaskan Malamute

Origin: North America, Ancient times
Weight: 80-110 lbs
Height: 23-28 inches

The Malamute is a friendly dog, but it has rather an independent temper. It’s better to keep this dog in a village, far from the city. Sometimes violent and energetic, they constantly need to move or play.

Note that Malamutes are a working dog breed from a colder climate.  So, if you don’t live in the deep north, make your Malamute a nice playground. That’s because they are always in need of physical activity.

The name of the breed comes from a local North American tribe. They used the Malamute to transport goods on a sleigh.

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Husky

Origin: Siberia, Ancient times
Weight: 35-55 lbs
Height: 20-24 inches

Training a Husky is not that easy. For these reasons, breeder don’t recommend this dog for beginning owners. Initially, these dogs transported goods on a sleigh. Not afraid of cold weather, they’re very active and loving dogs. Huskies love to get together with other members of their breed and howl at the moon.

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German Shepherd

Origin: Germany, 19th century
Weight: 70-85 lbs
Height: 22-26 inches

German Shepherds are very beautiful dogs, distinguished from other breeds by their reliable and obedient temper. They are in need of constant and serious physical activity though, and they seem to  prefer long walks and active games.

Originally (as obvious from the name), the dogs guarded grazing sheep. They are great home guards and often participate in programs for the disabled.

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Rottweiler

Origin: Germany, 1820s
Weight: 85-110 lbs
Height: 23-27 inches

Rottweilers are powerful dogs with strong jaws, primarily meant to protect. Their original breeders selected those traits especially for that purpose. They often don’t like strangers and other dogs — they are guards at heart, and the dog owner should always remember that.

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Pit Bull

Origin: US, 19th century
Weight: 30-55 lbs
Height: 18-22 inches

The Pit Bull is named after its original purpose: The questionable amusement of dog fighting in pits. Sad as it is, that bloody tradition has survived in places, and Pit Bulls still have to take their part in it.

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Photos source: Flickr

American Bulldog

Origin: Southern U.S., 17th century
Weight: 60-120 lbs
Height: 20-28 inches

The American Bulldog is descended from the now-extinct Old English Bulldog, which was bred for farm guarding, livestock herding and bringing down game, and blood sports such as bull-baiting.

Today’s American Bulldog arose from any such dogs brought to America by working-class immigrants, many of them former farmers. In the South, these dogs were an important line of defense against feral hogs.

By the time of World War II, the American Bulldog almost went extinct, but was saved through selective breeding. 

These dogs are large, heavy, and have powerful jaws with a typical overbite. They were bred for aggression and protection instincts. While they are suspicious of strangers, they are also very loyal and family-friendly. However, they need lots of space and attention. 

Bullmastiff

Origin: England, 19th century
Weight: 100-130 lbs
Height: 24-27 inches

Bred around 1860 by English gamekeepers, the Bullmastiff’s job was to guard game preserves. They caught poachers, holding them until they could be arrested. They emerged from a cross of the large but non-aggressive Mastiff with the aggressive but smaller, lighter Bulldog. 

Starting in the 20th century, they became a distinctive breed. 

Today, Bullmastiffs are typical watch and guard dogs. They are fiercely loyal and love their families, but they have an extremely strong territorial instinct, and can be stand-offish towards strangers. When they’re properly trained, Bullmastiffs are also frequently used as gentle therapy dogs. 

They are easy to groom, doesn’t shed, but are very prone to drooling. Bullmastiffs generally don’t need too much attention or movement. 

Note that this dog was bred to be very quiet, so it won’t audibly warn when it’s startled or otherwise in a bad temper. In combination with their strengths, this makes Bullmastiffs one of the potentially most dangerous dogs.

Note: This post was originally published on April 1, 2009. It has since been updated with a new introduction and further background on the history of dangerous dogs.

Join the discussion

1,044 comments
  • Where the hell did you get the information for this? Dalmatians aren’t aggressive. My uncle has a bunch of them and none of them even act aggressive.

  • that i so true pits were bred to fight. but i have grone up around pits that were abused and none of them have ever tearnd on any of me. in fact i have 3 pits and the youngest zoie we saved from this family that had beeten her and starved her so bad that we thout she would die for sure. it took us 3 mounts to get it ware we could even come close to her but, i found that she liked the kids beter than the grone ups. and it is not the dogs folt it is the oners falt. the dogs arnt boarn mean the people make them that way so that thay can eather gard the person or can fight. and i think that it is sick what people do and that is y when i grow up i am gona go to collidge so that i can open a shelter for pits only and pruve that not all pits r bad like people give them credit for. and if i see a pit beaing abused than i will get it an find a beter home 4 it. that is what i did with my old dog named dog. i was riding my bike with my friends and i saw some boys throing rocks at hem so i took a handfull of the bigest hevest rocks i could find and thrue them at the boys. and asked them how thay liked it. and i took the dog home with me and rased it till last year i came home from school. and went to water hem and he was not as enterjetic as normal. and adout a week went by and he got werse. and i came home and he was just lying thear i think he wated 4 me to come home so he could say good bye. cause he died right thair in my armes. and i did not move from his side all night. then we took hem to my grannys and bearied hem in the pet cemitary. so u see not all pits r bad

    • Aggressive dogs cant be sold if abused that may be animal cruelty how dare people treat animals they should treat them in a good way that’s what I do. I put up sigh to and try to change this around ever since I could talk and walk

  • I completely agree that with the right training dogs can not be dangerous. Why is Chow chow in the list of dangerous?? They are only medium size. I can easily beat my medium size
    (48pounds) lab/rottweiler. Our legs are so strong that when i trap her underneath them there is no way she can get out,and she uses her claws and teeth! Sometimes drawing blood. My dog is one year old. she has the temperment of a rotti.But looks like a lab.

    But then again the other dog we had was german shepherd, rotti,Akita ,and chow chow while she was only 45 pounds, but she killed 6 beavers

  • How can some people say German shepherds are dangerous!!!!! no BREED is dangerous.
    individual dogs sure,but you can not blame the breed OR that one dog, BLAME HUMANS.
    Example: If I got a wolf pup from birth and trained it like I would a German shepherd it would be no more dangerous that one. Unless there was something seriously wrong with it. It would be basically just like a dog. Yes it would have different instincts but what do you think dogs came from!
    But if you got a wolf when it was an adult sure it would be dangerous and you would have to keep it chained and muzzled. I absolutely detest people who put muzzles on there dogs just because of there Breed.
    I know of a person that had many purebred German shepherds some of them were wild and unpredictable but others were very nice. When I was three I rode on a German shepherds Back! That was very gentle dog.

  • I don’t know about the rest of you, but I don’t feel like reading half a page of passionate writing, so I’m going to make this short and sweet.

    First of all, I just have to say that to say any dog breed is “dangerous” is a complete misconception. It is true that some breeds are more prone to aggression than others, but in the end, it solely depends upon the owner.

    Secondly, the only dogs I believe should be up there are the Pitt Bull, German Shepard, Chow Chow, Rottweiler, and the Presa Canario, and not because they are “dangerous” at all, but only because they have true guarding instinct, which is often misdiagnosed as extreme aggression. They are only doing what they have been bred to do.

    and Thirdly, I completely disagree with the rest of the breeds up there, such as the Great Dane and the Saint Bernard- are you kidding me? Those dogs are some of the most gentle breeds I have ever known, and only in extreme conditions are they considered “dangerous”, but then again, that would be at the fault of the owner.

    Dogs are a tricky subject, and any post is probably going to upset some truly passionate people.

    • My aunt had a Saint Bernard years ago. Sweet family pet. And then one day it nearly mauled my mother’s eye out when she was visiting them — and she’s not exactly the type to provoke an animal, and it had known her and been friendly towards her for years. So I have a feeling she (and others) would disagree about that, and rightly so. No fault of the person attacked. No fault of the owner. The animal just snapped one day. It also attacked someone else in a similar way unprovoked not too far from that incident. The simple fact is that some dogs are known to seemingly snap without provocation more than others. Others are indeed bred to be more aggressive (and on that point I’ll agree that it’s the owner’s fault). And still others are indeed the types that simply get overprotective about their owners — which does definitely make them more “dangerous” than other breeds in general. Are there going to be exceptions to the rule? Always. Are most dogs in these breeds actually dangerous. I’d bet they’re not. But if there are a greater number of attacks or other aggressive displays of behavior when compared to other breeds, it doesn’t matter how frequent they are. “Most” is relative. And if all dogs are gentle, and one breed has let’s say 5 attacks reported, then that dog breed would clearly be the most dangerous. I think a part of the problem with getting overly defensive (and not saying you are personally) is that the comparative nature is lost. Of course I’d prefer seeing hard numbers / stats when seeing a list of anything dubbed the “most dangerous.” It could put things in better context.

  • This list states the most dangerous not the toughest, that I have read by some people, Boerbelo and Cane Corso, Presa’s, Dogo’s, Kangals,Wolf hybrids are not listed as most dangerous due to there low attack stats, Though these breeds can be brutal and deadly.

  • I have a Pit Bull and she is so sweet, would never hurt a fly. Saint Bernards are not even remotely aggressive, and huskies, while prone to nipping, would let an intruder steal your valuables, he might even help him. You also forgot a lot of mastiff breeds, such as the Tibetan Mastiff, Neapolitan Mastiff, Boerboel, Fila Brasiliero, Mastin de Espanol, etc. My Golden Retriever/Tibetan Mastiff mix is much more likely to attack someone than my Pit Bull, just sayin…

  • Yes absolutely Jazz!!! I don’t agree to the fact German Shepherds are dangerous They can be aggressive and that’s when they sense danger or something suspicious. I am a proud owner of 14 German Shepherds and if they would have been dangerous then for sure I would not be alive by now. But actually they all love spending time with my family and me. We just let them out in the fields and they love running around, chasing the monkeys stealing the fruits. They should be equally treated and you cannot be biased because they don’t like it. The more attention you give them, the more they love it. I think German Shepherds are supposed to be called as the sweetest dogs in the world.

  • I think that everyone should keep in mind that not all dogs have the potential to be dangerous and the ones labled as dangerous can be the most sweet. For example, my uncles grew up with the rottwhiler, they have had three in there lifetime. Not one has ever bit or attacked anyone. I think alot of a dogs behaviour comes from the ownership. just saying

  • THERE IS NO DANGEROUS BREED, JUST AS THERE IS NO DANGEROUS RACE, SEX, NATIONALITY ETC.

    THERE ARE BAD APPLES IN EVERY GROUP OF ANIMALS AND HUMANS.

    JUDGE THE ACTIONS OF AN INDIVIDUAL AND DON’T GENERALIZE ON THE GROUP OR BREED.

    WISE UP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

  • Since everyone always says it’s the owner and not the dog, then I’m going to response with this: The worst owners in my area are the owners of pitts. I work for the cable company and it is my job to work at the pole. I respect the dogs around my work area and use as much caution as possible to avoid problems. This being said, I’ve had multiple pitts come at me from neighboring yards. Some even jumping 6ft. privacy fences. Again, I work in pretty bad areas where the owners can’t pay a bill, children look like they need to be taken away by child services. This being said, I’ll take a bad owner of any dog other than a pitt any day. Sorry, but just as when you were a kid, the minority ruin it for the majority.

  • The Pit bull is an animal, and like any animal is subject to good training. However, I” personally cannot train him to the degree of reliability within my comfort zone; to which I can train most dogs. There are approximately 77 million dogs in the U.S.A. Every one of these animals; think, perceive, interpret and react. Although we can and do train our animals to respond only to “our personal” directive, they can and do respond to circumstance without our directing them.
    A dog is like a small child; and we must constantly be aware of what they child is doing, if we are to keep them from harm’s way. They both will both learn with or without our input. So there must be a strong leader from whom they can learn. Without that leadership respect and obedience will not happen. Respect is not an innate attribute of a dog or a child; it must be learned and earned. A dog who does not respect humans or child, who does not respect authority, becomes empowered and becomes the leader in that relationship.
    Aggression in any breed is a concern. With Pit Bulls, the consequences of the actually attack of is paramount. I do not trust any person or animal as individuals, until they have proven trust worthy. I give both the same respect; I would give a person with a gun in their hand, that being I do not place myself in a position where that persons carelessness; will cause me harm. A small (dog) BB gun in most cases cannot kill you, but it could blind you.
    Safety in handling dogs can only come from recognizing, understanding, learning, and using the mediums of communication the dog uses which, are Visual, that being physical movement of their extremities individually or in correlation, therefore we must be in a position to see the communications, such as the dog’s tail and/or ear movement, their body frame. Sound, that being the levels of barking, growls, whines, moans, therefore we must be in a position to hear the communication, and Tactile, that being; physical touch, therefore we must be in a position to feel the communication, such as the dog pulling on the leash while I am walking him. The dog’s communication conveys his intent or feeling toward something which has got his attention, be it animal vegetable or mineral.
    We bred dogs to develop certain innate features/traits. For whatever reason one chooses to argue; the Pit Bull and other dogs of like capacity were bred for the purpose of deterring threats by aggressive means. These traits remain in the dog today, although the average person having these dogs today, do not own or need them for the original purpose of breeding. The need” has turned to a desire” The new age, average owners are ignorant of and lack respect for the breeds capacity, training limits, and unreliability of obedience. Does this make them a BAD DOG NO! It makes them dog with traits, just like a sight hound verses a Scent hound. They are both dogs, but have capacities and limits that must be respected. Are there exceptions? YES
    An Obedient, Reliable dog follows the handlers command, even though it does not want to. This means when there is a threat, or other stimulus which incites the dog to revert back to his “innate state” of survival; your” training” which the dog learned to trust”, will surface and over ride his natural instincts to fight, flight, or chase. This type of training requires dedication, which I find the majority and average dog owners do not have.
    In comparing various breeds of dogs, we must look at their purpose and capacity, much like one would compare guns. For example; if there were a 44 magnum pistol, loaded, laying on a table….it is not dangerous!!! The gun does not think, interpret and react on its own as a dog does. A gun only becomes dangerous when someone picks it up, and is careless with it, or intentionally uses it,
    The Pit Bull in comparison to other dogs is (this may be over simplifying) a 44 magnum pistol; whereas the average dog is a 22 pistol. If the same surface of your shoulder is hit with a bullet from a 22 pistol, it is probably going to hurt, and may have residual adverse affect. If that same surface area is hit with a bullet from a 44 magnum; your shoulder will probably be destroyed. I am not an expert in guns and their capacity, although I have shot several different calibers and both, the 44 magnum and the 22 short.
    History is the best teacher, the problem is some of the students choose not to learn, and those few cause Havoc’ for the many. With every new generation of Dog owners…there come a small group of fools,

  • Please to whoever have pitt bulls. Yes they can be loving, but they still have that animal instinct I’ve had two pitts over the years. The first was great she wasn’t a full blooded pitt never had any problems with her. The second we had as a puppy trained her the same as our pitt mix. She was a full blood, killed two cats, chickens, bit my mother, killed another one of our dogs. They become very aggressive, and are hard to stop once they start. Please watch at the first sight of violence something needs to be done to protect your family.

  • I have had 2 boxers, currently have a boxer pit mix and a Rottweiler…all of which were and are amazing pets, and never once bit anyone or attacked other dogs… most of the time it is little fru-fru dogs (white little- and make a yapping bark noise) that are more vicious than larger breed dogs

  • I really enjoyed this web site. I love dogs, and have three pitts myself. They are great dogs. I too think it is sad that people still use pitts to fight. People give them such bad names and reps.

  • ..FACTS!! ..& nothin else = ”A woman died Friday afternoon after she was attacked by her dog while giving it a bath in the backyard of her home” .. At around 3:25 p.m. Coral Springs police received a call that a woman was being bitten by a dog at her residence in the 9300 block of NW 39 Ct. The woman’s young daughter ran to a neighbor’s house saying her mother was being bitten by the family dog. The neighbor called police and two officers were sent to the house. The officers were confronted by the dog, a breed known as a Presa Canario, who was standing near the woman’s body in the backyard. When the dog became aggressive towards the officers they shot at the dog killing it. Neither of the officers were injured. A typical picture of the bread is shown on the right. The woman, Shawna L. Willey, 30, of Coral Springs, was pronounced dead at the scene. It is unknown at this time why the dog attacked Willey.In Miami, there is a Pit Bull Law that prohibits the ownership of any of this type of breed. As well, several cities around the country have similar laws, including Denver, where in 1989 a child was killed by 3 of them. These laws are under constant attack by dog owners challenging the constitutionality of them. Each year more than 4.7 million Americans are bitten by dogs, and 800,000 require some sort of medical treatment. However, fatalities are quite low, at around 20 last year. /// Not enough? ..Ok 🙂 Another case = Diane Alexis Whipple (January 21, 1968 – January 26, 2001) was a lacrosse player and coach, who is best known as the victim of a fatal dog attack in San Francisco in January 2001. The dogs involved were two Presa Canario/mastiff mixes named Bane (male) and Hera (female), owned by neighbors living in the same apartment building.Whipple was killed on January 26, 2001, by two large Mastiff/Presa Canario dogs that attacked her in the hallway of the apartment building. The dogs were owned by neighbors, Marjorie Knoller and her husband Robert Noel, both attorneys. In 2000, Knoller and Noel obtained the two dogs, named Bane and Hera, through their relationship with Paul “Cornfed” Schneider, who was a Pelican Bay State Prison inmate and a leading member of the Aryan Brotherhood prison gang, who were attempting to start a dog fighting business.
    Due to his larger size, Robert Noel usually handled Bane, who weighed 140 pounds (64 kg). Marjorie Knoller was home alone with the dogs on January 26, 2001, and decided to take Bane up to the roof, just one flight up the stairs. Whipple was returning from a trip to the grocery store when Bane and possibly Hera attacked her in the hallway. (Hera’s role in the mauling has never been firmly established.) The dog(s) caused 77 wounds to Whipple, with only her scalp and feet escaping harm. Whipple died at San Francisco General Hospital; the cause of death was “loss of blood from multiple traumatic injuries (dog bite wounds).”
    Bane was euthanized immediately after the attack; Hera was seized and later euthanized in January 2002… FINALLY PLS TAKE A [email protected]@K THHS = http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_people_killed_by_dogs_in_the_United_States .. 😉

  • in my opinion,rotties and pitbulls are dangrous dogs BECAUSE of what they are capable to do. fo example,u can train a shitzu to attack and bite,but at the end of the day they arnt gunna do you much harm,yeh if they bite you it will hurt and maybe bleed a little but they not goin to rip your arm off..whereas if u trained a rottie or a pitbul to attack and bite,these dogs are so powerfull and strong that they are able not only to cause serious harm to a fully grown adult,but also they can kill you,which is why they are dangerous,bacause of what they are capable off,but its upto the owner on how the dog is trained,any dog can be trained to fight,bite,and be aggresive,but its what the dog is capable off,is what makes it dangerous.

    • I have a pitbull… hes 52 pounds. about the same size as a standard poodle… and yet still has a lower aggression rate…. hmm….

  • The Pit Bull is an animal and like other Big Dogs of like capacity they are subject to good training. There are approximately 77 million dogs in the U.S.A. Every one of these animals; are capable of thinking, perceiving, interpreting and reacting without our input or direction. Although we can and do train our animals to respond only to our personal directive
    A dog is like a small child; and we must constantly be aware of what they are doing and thinking if we are to keep them from harm’s way. Both will learn with or without our input so there must be a knowledgeable strong leader to protect and train them, without that leadership,respect and obedience will not happen. Respect is not an innate attribute of a dog or a child; it must be learned and earned. A dog or child who does not respect humans becomes empowered and becomes the leader in that relationship.
    Aggression in any breed is a concern. With Pit Bulls, and other like dogs of like capacity the consequences of an attack is paramount. I do not trust any person or animal as individuals, until they have proven trustworthy. I give both the same respect I would give a person with a gun in their hand, that being I do not place myself in a position where that persons carelessness will cause me harm.
    Safety in handling dogs can only come from recognizing, understanding, learning, and using the mediums of communication the dog uses which, are Visual, that being physical movement of their extremities individually or in correlation, therefore we must be in a position to see the communications, such as the dog’s tail and/or ear movement, their body frame. Sound, that being the levels of barking, growls, whines, moans, therefore we must be in a position to hear the communication, and Tactile, that being; physical touch, therefore we must be in a position to feel the communication, such as the dog pulling on the leash while I am walking him. The dog’s communication conveys his intent or feeling toward something which has got his attention, be it animal, vegetable or mineral.
    We breed dogs to develop certain innate features/traits. The Pit Bull and other dogs of like capacity were bred for the purpose of deterring threats by aggressive means. These traits remain in the dog today, although the average person having these dogs today, do not own or need them for the original purpose of breeding. The “need” has turned to a “desire.” Average owners are ignorant of and lack respect for the breeds capacity, training limits, and unreliability as regards obedience. Does this make the Pit Bull a BAD DOG? NO! It makes them dog with traits, just like a sight hound verses a Scent hound. They are both dogs, but have capacities and limits that must be respected. Are there exceptions? YES.
    An Obedient, reliable dog follows the handlers command, even though it does not want to. This means when there is a threat, or other stimulus which incites the dog to revert back to his “innate state” of survival; your “training” which the dog learned to trust, will surface and override his natural instincts to fight, flight, or chase. This type of training requires dedication, which I find the majority and average dog owners do not have.
    In comparing various breeds of dogs, we must look at their purpose and capacity, much like one would compare guns. For example; if there were a 44 magnum pistol, loaded, laying on a table….it is not dangerous!!! The gun does not think, interpret and react on its own as a dog does. A gun only becomes dangerous when someone picks it up, and is careless with it, or intentionally uses it,
    The Pit Bull and other like dogs of like capacity in comparison to other dogs is (this may be over simplifying) a 44 magnum pistol; whereas the average dog is a 22 pistol. If the same surface of your shoulder is hit with a bullet from a 22 pistol, it is probably going to hurt, and may have residual adverse affect. If that same surface area is hit with a bullet from a 44 magnum; your shoulder will probably be destroyed. I am not an expert in guns but please trust my analogy.
    Thinking along these same lines of potential affect of various dogs; I posed a question to myself. The law enforcement agencies use the fear factor of a growling snarling lunging dog. So why do the police not use Pit Bulls in their every day work? The police use other dogs, in high public profile, to support their law enforcement efforts, so why not the pit bull? A dog growling and lunging at the leash is a powerful image and certainly is a deterrent to any hostile approach to that officer. If it were a Pit bull; with my perception and understanding of that dog; my fear and concern would be much greater. The pit bull is rarely used because it isn’t anywhere near as reliable to obedience as the other breeds used in law enforcement. And let’s face it, I would not want to be in a crowd of people where a Pit Bull is on aggression leash and I am restricted from moving away from him.
    In closing; Do a group of citizens with a vested interest; have the right to ask for protection of animals through legislation by restricting certain animals and where they may be housed and what materials and specification must be used for such housing? YES Should animal owners be required to ensure their dogs remain on their property, and not place me and mine in peril? YES. Should Animal owners be held accountable for injury and mayhem their animals commit intentionally or unintentionally? YES
    Rights of Americans” it seem are no longer “inalienable”, but must now be legislated. That is not the way it should be. We have enough legislation; however irresponsible, ignorant, and selfish people require or cause all of us to suffer more legislation. Therefore; we must be diligent and prudent in writing such legislation, and in requiring responsible ownership. Can we require owners of put bulls or like dogs of like capacity; to train their animals’ NO”, but those owners should suffer the consequences of their poor or lacking training or control of such dogs.
    With every group of NEW” dog owners there comes ignorant, this will never change. But some owners recognize their responsibility and maintain control of and train the animals. However, I think there some that must eat Bowl of Stupid everyday………… because they and others like them keep missing the point. That point being….they, you, and I are responsible for any injury mayhem our dogs cause. And no matter who you are, or how much money one may be awarded as a result of for an encounter with BIG DOGS…..there is no bringing back to live of a person; adult or child, family or stranger, or replacing an eye scars, not to mention the fear the victim holds of other dogs, from that moment on.
    All we can do is keep tryiny and make it Harder on the BAD’ owners for them to own an animal of such capacity. Good training makes obeident dogs, we make the good by our care custody and control. So….which class do youy fall in?

  • I think people should not stereotype dogs by their breeds. Any dog raised wrong can be a danger to society. NOT just these dogs! WHO are you to tell us what type of dogs are the most dangerous dogs in the world? Check out ATTS.ORG temperament tests performed on all types of a lot of these dogs performed better then a bunch of types of dogs not listed here. for example Pitt bulls passed 89.6% of its test as opposed to a standard POODLE whose breed passed 86% or a GOLDEN RETRIEVER whose breed passed 84.6%….. there’s something to think about.

    • I’ve not seen the sharpei, nor the bully kutta, mastino napoletano, akita, etc, why not? they are extremely viscious and protective of their home and owners.They unlike many other breeds are willing literally fight to the death..where other dogs will back off and won’t go that extreme.
      I owned a labrador and currently(for the last ten years) own a ridgeback and a sharpei.( own is a poorly chosen word they are part of my fam.)
      Neither the labrador or the ridgeback had a nasty bone in their body, yet the sharpei is a totally different kettle of fish, (I had her since pup and raised her the same as the others, positive reinforcement not negative..plenty of treats and cuddles)The sharpei kills attacks and will hunt and fight until she’s dead if I don’t intervene..I have scar’s to prove it. So don’t tell me that as an owner I made a mistake and mistreated her..the ridgeback came later in my life and was brutally abused and responded to my behaviour with turning out to be a loyal sweet dog that does no longer pee on the floor when I enter a room, or hide under/ behind any available object. I despice the fact that it is always the owner that gets the blame. We have viscious dogs and we have dogs that will respond to threat in a fight or flight mode. Dogs are just genetically inclined to a certain behaviour ( if it wasn’t for that we wouldn’t seek certain breeds in the first place) and yes nurture does have an effect..but not as much as most like to believe. I will always love my sharpei but learned in painful ways that she might not be the breed I choose in the future.
      I did extensive research on many dogs And found that many dogs that are far more alert and attack prepared are those who present aloofness towards strangers. But don’t quote me on that one (do your own resarch and reach a conclusion) ..it was a similarity that i discovered in seeking a dog that would guard my property. I never had to take her for training or any other form to increase her lust for blood.
      I abhor violence and animal cruelty therefor feel offended and hurt when people suggest I trained or mistreated her in any way. Again plenty of breeds that are not mentioned here that are far more viscious than those on YOUR ten list.Isthar

    • Training and trust must go hand in hand. Training must be consistent and done in a manner that creates trust. Voice commands such as sit, stay etc…should be a daily routine. Walking with your pet in a park or on a country road is a great way to build a bond with them. One should never raise their hand to punish their dog, horse etc… Good communication with your pet as well is a must. This comes in the form of play time. Most dogs love balls. Ours play with soccer balls or the horse balls that you buy at the feed store. They have handles on them. Hugs and dog kisses are lavished upon you during this time. All animals respond to kindness and love. Those who are abused are more difficult to work with. Generally one must determine if they are able to be around children. In the case of dogs this is even more important as we have more dogs as our companions. As for those dogs that are trained to be aggressive and fighting dogs, I wouldn’t trust them with anyone. Now that is my humble opinion. When it comes to horses, there is an inherent danger in general due to their size and the fact that they often can spook at things that we overlook. I have worked with mean horses. Sometimes they are naturally mean but often it is the trainer that has created the behavior. Does this answer your question?

  • I think that this list is the same as most list i see when It comes to aggressvie or dangerous breeds. However I personally hate list like this because it paints a picture as if all dogs of a certain breed are dangerous and thats not all the way true. on the other hand if you research the cases of attacks and things in that nature you will more then likely see these dogs on the list several times. i dont think this means the entire breed is dangerous but that the pets living situation needs to investigated( you will more then likely find the problem).

    I have a 7 month old chow chow and he is the sweetest thing in the world however when i comes to my home or my car he is on guard. I take him to the dog park and he loves it and he plays with the really big dogs to the smallest dog in the park(when he feels like it ha ha). He also knows when play time is over and he is on duty. he gets up every few hours and he walks the house to make sure all is ok and he sleeps by the door to make sure if anyone comes to it they see him first.

    His jobs is to protect my home and my family and to be respectful to others(not love them but be friendly). ALL dogs at some point were use to protect or to alert or something in that natures so i think really all dogs have those same trait’s.

    the truth is HUMANS created Dangerous Dogs messing with mother nature and now All of use need to except them for what they are and what we created them to do.

    See when we needed German Shepard’s, pit bulls, Rotweillers, Chows, and the rest listed, those trait were great and accepted in society but now that they dont need them in those way anymore they want to band them How stupid is that.

    How are the dogs to know that what they were created for is no longer needed and they need to do something else. and then how are they to know how to channel those urges or energy.

    half the time we dont know how to deal with our own aggression as humans.

  • Pit bulls are mainly missunderstood. If they are raised to fight, they will. As if a person was raised to fight. If they are raised with a loving family and around lots of people and kids, they will be one of the best family dogs. Pit bull isn’t even a real breed, it is a term to describe 3 different breeds who are alike, American pit bull terrier
    American Staffordshire Terrier and Staffordshire Bull Terrier.

  • Mrs. St.julein
    I have never known any movement to ban any breed of dog; because that dog or breed of dog was well trained and controlled by their owner/handler.Dogs are not the problem….owners/handlers are because they are not responsable to the ability and capacity of their dog(s). When we alllow dogs to remain untrained and/or out of control…they do and always will think and react; if circumstance arise of which they are not familur and we are not there to support and guide them. With the exception of thinking for themselves, well trained and controlled dogs are like guns in the hands of responsable gun owner/user. That being an asset and an enhancement to humans. They are only dangerous when irresponsable and inexperienced people get involved.

  • Hi everyone I am hoping that you may be able to help me. My family and I have decided we would like to get a dog to add to our family but I am really nervous about it. Because we have a 4 yr old son and a 9 yr old daughter. My kids both requested a dog that is fuzzy and one that looks like a teddy bear. We decided a Chow Chow would work well and from what we heard it very protective. But I was looking into the breed to find out a little more about them and I came across several lists that warn they these dogs are 1 of the top 10 most dangerous dogs in the world. So now I’m not so syre if we should get a pet or not. Can anyone tell me if they have been bitten or if the breed is aggressive or just your opinions to help me decide whether to get the dog or not. Thanks so much.

    • TEAIRRA: I adopted a 10-year old Chow who was socialized very well with other people, kids, and animals. After we had to put him to sleep due to old age, we bought a 2 month old Chow from a breeder. I absolutely love this breed, however, they are not for everyone. While they are certainly cute and fuzzy, I would not readily recommend one, especially if you have small kids, and if the reason for getting one is just because of how they look. Chows are very independent, aloof, stubborn and NOT very tolerant of something they don’t like. They do not like being fussed over much and there is a fine line not to cross. They demand alot of respect and require a VERY EXPERIENED owner who is willing to spend the time socializing and training them. I would definitely do your research first before making a commitment, both for the sake of your family and this beautiful breed.

  • Teairra
    To get the right dog for your family, you must determine the original purpose of the dog and how close to that purpose will be his life style with your family.
    Take your time in making this decision. If you use poor judgement and get the wrong breed of dog, your chances and those of the are very goood at having an unhappy relationship. If you choose the breed that best suuit your life style, you must still have a good sound training program for both you andf the dog. There are many people calling thhemselves trainers, but few are worthy of the title.
    Training is about Communication. Dog are a lot like kids. They must have a continuous Education Program. Also everyone in the house must learn and use the same communication when relating to the dog. It would be very disrespectfull of the dog to not do so. I ask you not to give us another unhappy dog that must go to the pound and sit for ten days and be put to death. You have the power use it.

  • wow i have a pitbull and it was the most gentel nature of any other dog ive met my far and just because some of them are bred to be in fighting doesnt make them all aggresive

  • Hello! Julie E
    I am sorry…….But Training” and Trust” DO NOT go Hand in Hand. One can train” a dog or horse badly” and that” animal will not extend that trainer” trust. This Bad’ Training is a constant” in the world of our animals and people, we witness” it every day when we hear about dogs turning on their owner/handlers/trainers, in addition to attacking children and others.

    Training’ Good’ or Bad’ is an intentional’ endeavor/effort to modify’ behavior, where as Learning’ desired’ or undesired’ by humans, is an intentional or unintentional process.
    Any Trust’ an animal extends in a relationship ……must come from GOOD’ TRAINING.
    Jack Vance

    • You are over thinking my statement. Of course I am not referring to “bad” training but “good” training.

      I have great dogs and have turned out well trained horses.

      You know what they say…just like butt holes, everyone has an opinion and some stink worse then others.

      You do your thing and I’ll do mine. So far I have been right on target.

      I bite, not my dogs.

    • Okay, YOU can be right…just as long as it makes you feel good about yourself.

      You are the “know it all” type. I dealt with your kind while in the Army.

      Just happy that I don’t have to really meet you.

      My dogs are gentle and trained but I may bite you!!! GRRRRRRRRR Ruff, Ruff, Bow wow!

      And no, I refuse to sniff your butt… 😛

  • i have a new dog and i don’t know if he is dangerous.hes white and brown. if you have a answer,write it down in the comment section.

  • Hello Julie E
    I seek to learn from those who will share, I thank you for sharing with me. I am sure there is a lesson for me to learn from your comments. I will contemplate your remarks and look for the positive notes in them.
    Respectfully.
    God Bless & Be at Peace
    jack

  • Hello Julie E

    The Spirit of US in Equus
    By Jack Vance

    Oh you of speed and power with beauty unexcelled
    You have carried me upon your back close to Heaven and near Hell

    You have done my bidding through out the days less falter in your step
    You please me in so many ways I often feel inept

    When I think I understand you I sometimes often find
    The thoughts I am really having you have planted in my mind

    For more than half a century you have pulled my Heart Strings tight
    Now as I look ahead this day I see the end in sight

    The burls of life have come and gone but our partnership remains
    Mostly because of you my friend who looks not for personal gain

    The end of travel that I see is not for us to fret
    For the bridges we’ have built are ones of love and sweat

    We have had our time in this world to build that bridge of trust
    Now others who might follow can see it was a must

    Admittedly I am not the greatest trainer, heck I am not even renowned
    But then you are not the Greatest Horse, just the best one that’s around

    Learning has been a privledge, I hope I continue to be worthy of that privledge. Being Right’ is not important……discovering what is Right’ is important.

      • Enigma
        Enigma, Enigma, why was thy born?
        Of Forlorn is my birth, my trek, to remind.
        Those who seek answers must think’ to find.
        Many answers are offered but few bare true.
        To resolve the question of, what one should do.

        Hello Julie E
        My name is jack Vance, I am an individual, not renowned, celebrated or notorious. I travel the country, in a two horse trailer with a living qtrs. picking up work as I go. I train horses for riding and driving, single of multi-hitch, drafts or light horses, and work on remedial horse and dogs as well, in addition to training dogs for obedience and pulling, as with a horse, as in a cart or wagon, not for competition.Those i collect letters of reference I am presently visiting my daughter in Ky. Departing today for the Iowa Midwest Horse Sale in Nov., in Waverly Iowa. Then to Canada
        People’ sometimes become incited (not always in a positive way) By my comments. Which is OK’ because I use it as a learning tool to enhance Expressing my opinion.

        • Well Mr. Jack “The Enigma” Vance,

          We are closer than you think,

          Your travels take you to my past,

          Canada was my final destination…

          • Hello Jullie E
            I am in Fairfield Iowa now’ will be here for ? Then canada. So where is Canada in the annals of your mind and life.

          • Hi Jack,

            I am from South Dakota so you are close to my home state.

            My husband is from Canada. He immigrated as a child.

            He was my final destination.

            He and I share many things in common and the love of dogs is one of them.

            Enjoy your travels Jack and I am sure I will hear from you again. You are a snarky one! It takes one to know one… 🙂

  • Hogwash!!!!My Rottie is VERY GENTAL!!! He is my service dog and would do ANYTHING asked of him. He loves people in particular children!! He loves to pull my wheelchair and pick things up for me!! He is the ideal dog citizen!!

    • The Rott is a working dog, and by letting your buddy pull your wheelchair, you are taping into the very core of why that dog was bread in the first place. Rotts were created as carting dogs, that was there job, to pull small carts. To him, your wheelchair is part of his life. He HAS to pull it, because he was made to pull it.

      I’m so glad you enjoy your Rott. The big black and tan teddy bears.

  • okay so i have had 2 huskies and they are the nicest dog i have ever owned my huskie now lets me pet her and hug her tackle her and she doesnt even care.. shes one of the best dogs that i have ever seen

    • Yup, pretty much correct. Either through neglect, not understanding the dogs needs and traits, or just to make a mean dog. The handler is the reason a dog is mean or aggressive.

  • Nuclear bombs are very dangerous, but countries are spending huge resources to have these weapons. By owning dangerous dogs does not mean that they are not dangerous the same as owning atomic bombs does not mean that these bombs are not dangerous

  • I am the proud owner of 3 Boxer dogs 3 English Mastiffs And a Dougue de bourdoaux and I am a strong believer that a dog only behaves how they are treated and just because a dog is protective, doesnt meen that they are agresive, its just in there nature.

    • In my opinion’
      In animals or humans; Aggression’ is a physical action reflecting a state of mind. There are individual within the species of Horses’ dogs or humans, and other animals, which have a “Get along” attitude, in short they are amenable to you or your ideas or way you want to do things. There are others who, if things do not go their way , will pout and sulk, yet others will display outward aggression, but not take it to the physical level, still yet there are other who will’ when angered’ will quickly get physically aggressive.
      Good parents work toward building a roundness of good characters in a child, yet let them display anger so they learn (consequences of choice) to control it. In animals when angered they display it toward those present, in doing so they suffer or enjoy the results.
      Good trainers have the ability to know animals’ innate attributes which in part help us to develop some control of the animal’s physical behavior. We cannot stop them from thinking or reacting, but we can affect their outward conduct and through familiarizing and desensitizing them to circumstance, we can predict their behavior. This is what Obedience Training is about, whether it involves Attack or Guard or Passive training, it is still obedience. Having this ability, we must not place’ or allow the animal in circumstance in which we are not confident in our ability to minimize adverse consequences of their behavior or upon them.
      jack

  • Your historical information on the Rottweiler is not accurate. Rotts were originally bread as carting dogs, a working class. They enjoy nothing better than hauling things in a wagon or cart. I have rescued and fostered many Rotts over the years and the reputation of being a bully dog is unfounded.

    Any dog can be made mean. The handler is at fault, not the dog. I’ve received nastier bites and had worse fights with small dogs, than any you’ve listed here. Almost had my thumb taken off by a Lasa Apso. A 15 pound dog, would not let go for anything. I’d rather have a Rottweiler than one of those little pricks.

  • Of the organizations cited by this “study”, only the cdc provides a list of dangerous dogs. Here’s their comments and list:

    While national statistics show at least 30 breeds have attacked humans, 10 dog breeds are on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s most dangerous list, meaning they tend to bite the most frequently. They are:

    Pit bulls
    Rottweilers
    German Shepherds
    Huskies
    Alaskan Malamutes
    Doberman Pinschers
    Chow Chows
    Great Danes
    St. Bernards
    Akitas

    The breeds considered most likely to kill are pit bulls and rottweilers.”

    Dalmatians, Boxers, and Presa Canarios are not listed as “dangerous dogs”.

    I thin an apology is needed here as such fake lists are very dangerous!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • The Dalmatian IS on the list of the most deadly/dangerous dogs. As a matter of fact it is number 10 on the list. Boxer is number 9 and Presa Canarios is number 8 so I think you should read the list again. I don’t agree with any of this bullshit anyways. The dogs that bite are either taught to bite or not taught not to bite. Any dog will bite if put in the wrong situation.

  • Ok… I work at a pet store in VA and I’ve NEVER been snapped at by any of these breeds, we have at least 20 pitbulls come in EVERY day… one of my coworkers owns a saint bernard mix and he’s a gentle giant. I’ve had one dog snap at me in a year of working there and it was a GOLDEN RETRIEVER!! This is abunch of media BS.

  • I have 4 dobermans and I know there are exception to the rule but none of them have ever shown any aggression to anything or anybody. They are no different than a lab, shepherd, australian shepherd etc…. They are dogs. Any dog has the potential to be aggressive and if all bites were reported the most dog to bite a human would probably be a lap dog of some sort. But because they don’t do the damage big dogs do they don’t get reported. Dobermans are not aggressive by nature, it has to be a taught behavior. It is also because they have a bad rap in the movies and media in general that people have a fear of them. Once any dog knows someone is afraid of them they are showing weakness which will cause any dog to bite.

  • i own a staffordshire bull terrier, and although she isn’t a pitbull, she is a bull breed. and although she hates other dogs due to being attacked by a SPRINGER SPANIEL! when she was 6 months old, she is the best dog you could ask for.
    i would honestly love a pitbull but sadly i can’t as i’m from the uk and pitbulls are a banned breed.
    a dog will be your best friend for life, if treated correctly. i work at a rescue kennels and the amount of prejudice i recieve everyday for the bull breeds (especially staffies) is stupid, they are lovely dogs and sadly every week we are having to take at least 3 dogs to the vets to be euthanised purely because we don’t have room because nobody wants them and the sad thing is that most of the time it’s bull breeds. (believe me if we didn’t get made to take them by the council, we wouldn’t)
    any dog can be dangerous if not treated correctly.
    it’s the owner that makes the dog the way it is. always has been, always will be.
    so i urge people to think about adopting a bull breed, they are marvolous dogs and will give you your heart providing you give them yours.

  • what is the most vicious breed the answer is there isnt any!! It all depend on how you raise them i have 2 rottweilers the most sweetest gentelest caring dogs ive ever owned im tired of people saying there vicious or watch out there going to bite your arm off!!! it makes me soo mad only people who own rotties know this all the other people follow the media and same with the pitbulls probably even more gentler than rotties pitbulls are sooo gentle just big huge teddy bears that want love a labrador can be mean so i dont what the media is talking about!!!!!

  • Hello Jennifer
    Referencing your post “What is the most vicious breed, the answer is; there isn’t any!! I would support that position, there is no single or numerous breeds that are vicious; with a notation; there are vicious dogs within almost every breed!! The bottom line is BIG DOG” have a greater capacity because of their BIG BITE, therefore greater consequences if and when adverse acts of aggression occur, regardless of the provocation.
    Most owner are not responsable enough to be aware of the trouble approacjing their dog and or the dog is not obedient. It is our responsablity to keep our dogs out of trouble.

  • I agree with most of the animals on here. One that most people are surprised by is the dalmation, but they do have a tendency to be aggressive. They are not good family dogs because they’re not good with children. One dog I was surprised to see on the list is the Great Dane. I feel like people are intimidated by them because of their size. Most research I have seen says that they are quite docile. We had one when I was younger. While he was protective of his family, he was easily trained and became one of the sweetest dogs I’ve owned. I was not aware that Saint Bernards were aggressive. That was interesting.

  • While training is important, one has to consider the background of the dog. Saying you can change a whole breed that has been bred to be aggressive to a lapdog overnight is like saying a tiger can be tamed.

  • Good Morning! Livelaugh&love Your comment is on target. There is always a new generation of dog owners and there shoould be pre aquisation period where one’
    Research Research Research, That the shortest most direct pathway to discovering what breed of Dog will fit into you life style. Research is becoming familur with the given breed in all arenas, home, public, play, trouble, new encounters of everyday life your dog may encounter. That is how you become worthy of a relationship with a animal.
    I was reading the Boone County KY Recorder and come upon an article about Walton Ky. not permitting Pit Bulls in the city. The Pit Bull; is a beautiful, magnificent looking animal, with very powerful physical abilities. Like any animal of this magnitude, their presence demands one’s attention and admiration and in my case concern and absolute respect for their capacity.
    Respect is a little word with many connotations as well as a two way street. From what I see, most people are not worthy of a dogs respect much less obedience.
    I must say; I have handled only about three or four Pit bulls; so I do not consider myself an authority on that breed. But I consider myself competent and understanding of the psychological makeup of the average dog, which allows me to train them. Any good trainer can train any dog to perform what that dog is physically capable of. A trainer cannot make a dog, reliable, or a good dog, the dog must be born with these qualities.
    “The American Canine Temperament Testing Association, which sponsors tests for temperament titles for dogs, reported that 95% of all APBTs that take the test pass, compared with a 77% passing rate for all breeds on average. The APBT’s passing rate was the fourth highest of all the breeds tested. One of the requirements for taking this test is: the dog must at least 18 months old.
    I think by 18 months of age, any good trainer can have the average dog well trained to obedience and very comfortable in an environment where energy in both; sound and sight are abnormally high. This temperament status’ can reflect a dogs self confidence, his get along, or in your face attitude, as well as the dog’s training history. Training’ by the way is; any intentionally act by the trainer or handler to modify a behavior.
    The Pit Bull is fearless and relentless in combat whether in self defense or initiating the combat. These dogs can weigh in at over 100lb. put two of these dogs together, working on a common cause and they are formidable. They and other dogs of like innateness will remain a serious threat to the safety of owners, other people and other dogs, until the owners acknowledge and accept their responsibility.
    The owners must change the way they think of their dogs. They must learn to recognize and understand how a dog communicates. In addition to learning and understanding their dog’s attributes, ability, and capacity. This process is another two way street of learning and training.
    To a dog we are merely an animal, some of us are big (adults) some are small (infants and children). In regards to Pit bulls;, and other BIG dogs of like capacity; there are far too many incidents at home and in public; where these dogs have wreaked havoc on people. These incidence of injury, (which are far greater in damages to persons than incidence with the average dog), could not have taken place in most cases, if the owner/handler knew and was attentive to the dog’s communications.
    When in public all dogs should be on leash. The leash and collar (capable of restraining the dog in times of stress) is probably the most valuable piece of equipment one can own. The leash will keep your dog from going too’ trouble, and enhances the person handling their dog safely, should trouble come to them. In addition; we with obedient dogs have control through obedience even when we are not in the immediate presence of the animal. The leash tied to something, lets the public know the dog is not unattended…..but instead obedient in remaining where it is outside the store where we put the down.
    There are many stories where dogs jerk away from owners/handlers. If a person handling a 100 pound dog was jerked to the ground and retained hold of the leash, it would be very difficult for a 100 pound dog to drag the average person of 165 pounds for any great of distance in an effort to get to another dog or person.
    I am a practicing trainer of dogs for obedience and horses for riding and driving, single or multi hitch. I am nomadic, in that I travel across the U.S.A. in my work. I like to think I keep my opinion open to persuasion, which keeps my mind open to learning.
    In my travels, I have retrained aggressive dogs and they adjusted well. When I take a dog to train, I work with the owners also. I try to enhance their understanding of what they must learn and practice if they want to maintain a good relationship with their dog. I have found all dogs are not good natured and compatible with the average person. In my travels I see a lot of good natured animals, and ill natured animals being handled badly.
    Most of the time, I found the owners were lacking in their dedication in communication with their dog, which allows the dog to regress back to its former undesirable behavior. This is one of the reasons I do not train Pit Bulls, or Attack/Guard dogs . I do not want my name referenced as the trainer, should a mishap occur.
    The Pit bull is an animal, and like any animal is subject to good training. However, I” personally cannot train him to the degree of reliability within my comfort zone; to which I can train most dogs. There are approximately 65 million dogs in the U.S.A. Every one of these animals; think, perceive, interpret and react. Although we can and do train our animals to respond only to “our personal” directive, they can and do respond to circumstance without our directing them.
    A dog is like a small child; and we must constantly be aware of what they child is doing, if we are to keep them from harm’s way. They both will both learn with or without our input. So there must be a strong leader from whom they can learn. Without that leadership respect and obedience will not happen. Respect is not an innate attribute of a dog or a child; it must be learned and earned. A dog who does not respect humans or child, who does not respect authority, becomes empowered and becomes the leader in that relationship.
    Aggression in any breed is a concern. With Pit Bulls, the consequences of the actually attack of is paramount. I do not trust any person or animal as individuals, until they have proven trust worthy. I give both the same respect; I would give a person with a gun in their hand, that being I do not place myself in a position where that persons carelessness; will cause me harm. A small (dog) BB gun in most cases cannot kill you, but it could blind you.
    Safety in handling dogs can only come from recognizing, understanding, learning, and using the mediums of communication the dog uses which, are Visual, that being physical movement of their extremities individually or in correlation, therefore we must be in a position to see the communications, such as the dog’s tail and/or ear movement, their body frame. Sound, that being the levels of barking, growls, whines, moans, therefore we must be in a position to hear the communication, and Tactile, that being; physical touch, therefore we must be in a position to feel the communication, such as the dog pulling on the leash while I am walking him. The dog’s communication conveys his intent or feeling toward something which has got his attention, be it animal vegetable or mineral.
    We bred dogs to develop certain innate features/traits. For whatever reason one chooses to argue; the Pit Bull and other dogs of like capacity were bred for the purpose of deterring threats by aggressive means. These traits remain in the dog today, although the average person having these dogs today, do not own or need them for the original purpose of breeding. The need” has turned to a desire” The new age, average owners are ignorant of and lack respect for the breeds capacity, training limits, and unreliability of obedience. Does this make them a BAD DOG NO! It makes them dog with traits, just like a sight hound verses a Scent hound. They are both dogs, but have capacities and limits that must be respected. Are there exceptions? YES
    An Obedient, Reliable dog follows the handlers command, even though it does not want to. This means when there is a threat, or other stimulus which incites the dog to revert back to his “innate state” of survival; your” training” which the dog learned to trust”, will surface and over ride his natural instincts to fight, flight, or chase. This type of training requires dedication, which I find the majority and average dog owners do not have.
    In comparing various breeds of dogs, we must look at their purpose and capacity, much like one would compare guns. For example; if there were a 44 magnum pistol, loaded, laying on a table….it is not dangerous!!! The gun does not think, interpret and react on its own as a dog does. A gun only becomes dangerous when someone picks it up, and is careless with it, or intentionally uses it,
    The Pit Bull in comparison to other dogs is (this may be over simplifying) a 44 magnum pistol; whereas the average dog is a 22 pistol. If the same surface of your shoulder is hit with a bullet from a 22 pistol, it is probably going to hurt, and may have residual adverse affect. If that same surface area is hit with a bullet from a 44 magnum; your shoulder will probably be destroyed. I am not an expert in guns and their capacity, although I have shot several different calibers and both, the 44 magnum and the 22 short.
    Thinking along these same lines of potential affect of various dogs; I posed a question to myself. The law enforcement agencies use the fear factor of a growling snarling lunging dog. So why do the police not use Pit Bulls in their every day work? The police use other dogs, in high public profile, to support their law enforcement efforts, so why not the pit bull? A dog growling and lunging at the leash is a powerful image and certainly is a deterrent to my approaching that officer or the dog. If it were a Pit bull; with my perception and understanding of that dog; my fear and concern would be much greater. Because I do not think the dog is anywhere near as reliable to obedience as the other dogs.
    Police use these same high profile dogs for patrolling with them on leash, riding with them in the cars, detecting drugs, and perhaps other areas as well. From what little’ I know of the Pit Bull and of other breeds; I would not want to be in a crowd of people where a Pit Bull is on leash and I am restricted from moving away from him.
    In closing; Do a group of citizens with a vested interest; have the right to ask for protection of animals through legislation by restricting certain animals and where they may be housed and what materials and specification must be used for such housing? YES
    Should animal owners be required to ensure their dogs remain on their property, and not place me and mine in peril? YES.
    Should Animal owners be held accountable for injury and mayhem their animals commit intentionally or unintentionally? YES
    Rights of Americans” it seem are no longer “inalienable”, but must now be legislated. That is not the way it should be. We have enough legislation; however irresponsible, ignorant, and selfish people require or cause more legislation. If it must be; we must be diligent and prudent in writing such legislation.
    On the subject of “Rights of Americans” Do those same citizens legislating matters of animals, have the right to keep me from owning, displaying, or using any gun?
    NO…….until I’ as an individual’ prove unworthy of that inalienable right. Guns do not think, interpret and react, Guns only function by our intervention.

  • I have a 12month old male Chihuahua, greatest little dog, he doesnt like kids and can be aggressive when he is playing. I’m looking to get another dog, either a Doberman or Labrador, anyone recommend either to go with my little Chihuahua, I know a Lab will be fine but not 100% sure on the Doberman?????

  • Hi i just wanted to know about pitbull dogs that they are made from i mean somebody told me that they are made from pigs ans dogs the mother is pig and the father is dog is any one has and info about these dogs so please let me know
    Thank you

  • yalll really need to shut up cause yall dont know crap about what yall are saying. Pitbulls are not mean they are the most loving dog youll ever meet they are not dog agressive either. I have 10 and they love everyone and anydog they meet so yall need to shut up and stop giving them a bad name just cause they look me or 1 was mean doesnt mean that they all are so shut up cause their not watch pitbulls and parlooes or pit boss on animal planet and TLC and youll see what I’m talking about so yall can suck it

  • I need india dogs list with thire name,breed, sige , meximum age & prece.
    kindly post me on my E-mail ID.
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    if you are able to available the breed of goats and there price list then plese send on my E-mail ID
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  • So I agree that Pitbulls are on here, they have lock jaw, are illegal in Canada right now! They also have the horrid issue where if they hear so much as a kid laugh the wrong way they can snap and attack people. All dogs have it yes, but they have like Bi=Polar disorder….Poor guys its our fault most of these dogs are so aggressive, look at what most of it says, THEY ARE BRED TO GUARD! We bred and I guess brain washed (at the time it was trained0 the BREED to act a certain way….in the end we regret alot of it…and the whle dog fighting thing…so unfortunate…Dogs like, my dog, a yellow Lab, is used for dogs like pi bulls to tear apart for pit fighting, It makes me so angry i wish I could actually do something about all of this, but half the time no one really tried to stop any of this!

    • Doesn’t anyone understand basic canine anatomy?!
      No dog has a locking jaw. Every canine has the same set of jaws, none of which have the ability to lock. And what did you say about bipolar disorder? Learn your mental conditions please.
      And pitbulls arent a breed. They are many breed actually, all classified under the same name.

  • And you forgot my other favorite dog.

    The Japanese Akita.

    Bigger and stronger than the Shepard, but not as smart.

    They do not suffer fools gladly.

  • [insulting comments removed]. We all understand that you think your pitbull/other beast is a wonderful family dog and would not hurt anyone. Owners do usually think like that. These dogs are like ticking bombs on legs – you never know when they cause harm. As said before, it’s their strength and size of the head/jaw that makes them dangerous. They may kill, and may not, too.

    • You could say the same thing about people…..ticking bombs on legs. Never know what is going to set a person off, but we don’t walk around weary of one person versus another. And yes, I am the owner of a sweetheart of a pit. She sleeps with me at night, plays great with my cousin’s 1 and 5-year-old and plays well with other dogs. It’s all in the upbringing……just like people.

  • i have 300 dogs in pakistan. i have purchased all dogs from abroad. In pakistan no one can fight my dog i hav won 100 tola gold in dog fighting. I am King in the Dog World,
    Regards,
    Malik Yasir Naeem
    0092+0322-9130095

  • I just want to say that I am an owner of both an American Pitbull Terrier and a Doberman Pinscher. I’ve owned many dogs in my life and these 2 dogs take the cake. Only dog that comes close to beating them out is my father’s 14yr old Border Collie. He definitely ties with my Dobie. Both dogs are extremely loyal, intelligent, fun loving, so happy you couldn’t make them sad dogs. I enjoy my Dobie and Pit. They’re constantly entertaining and ever watchful pals. It definitely helped when I lived in an iffy neighborhood outside of Ft. Knox, KY. I couldn’t ask for better dogs. As for aggressive? Only when threatened by strangers at the home. Outside the home, they’re aloof and happy to meet everybody! Excellent dogs. Pits only have a bad rep because of bad owners. It’s a breed that needs to be socialized heavily at a young age. Both breeds really. But that’s all dogs, not just “aggressive” breeds.

  • Some dog breeds can be aggressive, but its mostly the situation or the way someone treats the dog that makes it bite. My (stupid) friend thought Golden Retrievers are the #1 dog that bites, but thats a load of b.s… they can bite, but they arent bred to fight, they are bred to retrieve. 🙂

  • Have to read this funny funny comment i dont care if you do not like it you dont even know my name ( in your face what are you going to do about it nothing!!!!!) :p :p :p

    Those are like so dangerous and i cant like even imagine coming near them I was very mch enjoying those pictures thank you hope youn upload more you know pit bulls are like soooooooooo cool i dont know what i am even doing just talking like that all i do every day is just bla bla bla chica bow bow what the heck did i just say chica bow bow okay okay i get it off topic back to dogs again, oh yah pit bulls, thayre coooool!!!!!

  • I find this list to be untrue.. i have owned a pitbull that wouldnt hurt a fly.. it is about how the r raised… and they same would g for the boxer has i have also owned one of those… he was a sweet heart and a cuddle bug… the rotties r the same as well as the doverman… if u really wanna talk about mean dogs try stickin ur hand out to a chiuaiua or one of them small ankle bitters that will go at ur feet just beacuse u enter their bubble… its not the breed of dog thats mean it is how they r raised.. it is the owners… the breeds in this list r mostly protectors… my dogs have never bit anyone but they let them knw when they need to back the hell up… just because the dog is big and looks mean dont always mean they are…

  • Are you kinding me i’m 12 and i have a germand shepherd a rottweiler and a pit bull a doberman and a husky i was 9 when i had then at the same time and i tough them every thing and not one day they tried to bite me or a person that i know

  • pitbull are not dangerous at all,its all how you raise them as in any other dog.ive had pitbulls all my life and there great.

  • Well! Crissy poo your position is on the money. but the message is falling on deaf ears, so Here we go again
    The name of this site; “The Most Dangerous Dogs in the World” is certainly not accurate in the content. However I think it incites people to comment and debate. Which I think is good, as it creates communication. Communication leads to Resolution” As I see it; we are all entitled to our opinion be it ignorant, biased, or knowledgeable in experience. As long as there is communication the truth will eventually prevail. Learning is an intentional and unintentional process, however we as individuals have the responsibility to establish what we learn’ is in fact the truth.
    I think for the most part your comments were accurate, when one writes a public comment; one must be very accurate in the content. Below are my thoughts
    DOG TRAINING & PITBULLS
    Can proper obedience training and owner control make a potentially ‘Dangerous Dog a safe canine companion? What about a pit bull with inherent dominance and fighting ability?
    I was reading a newspaper article about Walton KY not permitting Pit Bulls in the city. The Pit Bull is a beautiful, magnificent looking animal, with very powerful physical abilities. Like any animal of this magnitude, they demand one’s attention and admiration and in my case, concern and absolute respect for their capacity.
    Respect is a little word with many connotations as well as a two way street. From what I see, most people are not worthy of a dogs respect much less obedience.
    I must say I have handled only about three or four Pit bulls; so I do not consider myself an authority on that breed. But I am competent and understanding of the psychological makeup of the average dog, which allows me to train them. Any good trainer can train any dog to perform what that dog is physically capable of. A trainer cannot make a dog reliable or a change the breed characteristics a dog is born with. No trainer can insure that training and control will be properly maintained by the owner.
    In support of any breed which the public views with disfavor; I say; Change begets Change. So if one wants the public opinion to change, make that change happen, one dog at a time, then 10, then 100. Breed the undesirable traits out and the good one in.
    A good example to follow to accomplish this goal would the breeding program of horses. Such as; the American Mustang horses or the Przewalski horse of China, the people with “Horse in the Heart” want to protect these breeds as well as others, but the majorities do not want to own, ride or show them.
    The majority of horse people want a horse that full fill their personal desire. There are enough breeds of fine horses to full fill the particular needs of all. One of those breeds is the American Quarter Horse. It is the most so popular breed. They started with what they considered a good horse and bred it to another good horse; from there they just kept breeding the best to the best. They bred in; the good traits and bred out the undesirable ones. This breed is diverse in innate attributes which serve the vast and multi particular needs of the horse industry. The public soon discovered certain blood lines were better at a particular event or activity than were others, and the rest is history. Because they continue to look for way to improve the bred, the American Quarter Horse is the largest breed registry in the world.
    In 1940 the American Quarter Horse Association was founded. The AQHA did not get to be the largest breed in the world without conflict and compromise. In the early years there were some who had different ideas of how the Quarter Horse should be developed. Consequently in 1945 the National Quarter Horse Breeders Association was founded. However both groups realized there was a future for this breed of horse so they worked out their difference and the breed developed into the “Great American Horse”. If these two entities of different values accomplished this phenomenon of animal breeding, the Pit Bull breeders and those of like breeds of today can do the same thing. There is no patent on success.
    The Pit Bull is fearless and relentless in combat whether in self defense or initiating an encounter. Although most weigh less the; the Pit bulls can weigh in at a formidable 100 pounds. They can be a serious threat to the safety of irresponsible owners, other people and dogs, unless the owners acknowledge and accept their responsibility.
    The owners must change the way they think of their dogs. They must learn to recognize and understand how a dog communicates in addition to learning and understanding their dog’s attributes, ability, and capacity.
    To a dog we are merely an animal, some of us are big (adults) some are small (infants and children). As regards Pit bulls; there are far too many incidents in which Pit Bulls, at home and in public, have wreaked havoc on people. These incidence of injury, (which are far greater in damages to persons than with the average dog), could not have taken place in most cases, if the owner/handler knew and was attentive to the dog’s communications.
    When in public all dogs should be on leash. The leash and collar (capable of restraining the dog in times of stress and installed properly) is probably the most valuable piece of equipment one can own. The leash will keep your dog from going towards trouble and it enhances handling the dog safely, should trouble come to them.
    If a person handling a 100 pound dog was jerked to the ground and retained hold of the leash, it would be very difficult for a 100 pound dog to drag the average 150 pound person for any great of distance in an effort to get to another dog or person.
    I am a practicing trainer of dogs for obedience and horses for riding and driving, single or multi hitch. I am nomadic, in that I travel across the U.S.A. in my work. I like to think I keep my opinion open to persuasion, which keeps my mind open to learning. In my travels, I have retrained aggressive dogs and they adjusted well. When I take a dog to train, I work with the owners also. I try to enhance their understanding of what they must learn and practice if they want to maintain a good relationship with their dog. I have found all dogs are not good natured and compatible with the average person. In my travels I see a lot of good natured animals, and ill natured animals being handled badly.
    Upon revisiting the dogs and owners, I found the owners were lacking in their dedication in maintaining communication with their dog, resulting in loss of control, which allows the dog to regress back to its former undesirable behavior. This is one of the reasons, I do not train Pit Bulls, or other big’ dogs of like innate capacity. I do not want my name referenced as the trainer, should a mishap occur.
    The Pit bull is an animal, and like any animals of like innate capacity, he is subject to good training. However, I personally cannot train him to a degree of reliability within my comfort zone; that to which I can train most dogs. There are approximately 65 million dogs in the U.S.A. Every one of these animals; think, perceive, interpret and react. Although we can and do train our animals to respond only to our personal directive, they can and do respond to circumstance without our directing them.
    A dog is like a small child; and we must constantly be aware of what they are doing and thinking if we are to keep them from harm’s way. Both will learn with or without our input so there must be a strong leader to protect and train them. Without that leadership, respect and obedience will not happen. Respect is not an innate attribute of a dog or a child; it must be learned and earned. A dog who does not respect humans or a child who does not respect authority becomes empowered and becomes the leader in that relationship.
    Aggression in any breed is a concern. With Pit Bulls, the consequences of an attack are paramount as with any dog of like innate capacity. I do not trust any person or animal as individuals, until they have proven trustworthy. I give both the same respect I would give a person with a gun in their hand, that being I do not place myself in a position where that persons carelessness will cause me harm.
    Safety in handling dogs can only come from recognizing, understanding, learning, and using the mediums of communication the dog uses which, are Visual, that being physical movement of their extremities individually or in correlation, therefore we must be in a position to see the communications, such as the dog’s tail and/or ear movement, their body frame. Sound, that being the levels of barking, growls, whines, moans, therefore we must be in a position to hear the communication, and Tactile, that being; physical touch, therefore we must be in a position to feel the communication, such as the dog pulling on the leash while I am walking him. The dog’s communication conveys his intent or feeling toward something which has got his attention, be it animal, vegetable or mineral.
    We breed dogs to develop certain innate features/traits. The Pit Bull and other dogs of like capacity were bred for the purpose of deterring threats by aggressive means. These traits remain in the dog today, although the average person having these dogs today, do not own or need them for the original purpose of breeding. The “need” has turned to a “desire.” Average owners are ignorant of and lack respect for the breeds capacity, training limits, and unreliability as regards obedience. Does this make the Pit Bull a BAD DOG? NO! It makes them dog with traits, just like a sight hound verses a Scent hound. They are both dogs, but have capacities and limits that must be respected. Are there exceptions? YES.
    An Obedient, reliable dog follows the handlers command, even though it does not want to. This means when there is a threat, or other stimulus which incites the dog to revert back to his “innate state” of survival; your “training” which the dog learned to trust, will surface and override his natural instincts to fight, flight, or chase. This type of training requires dedication, which I find the majority and average dog owners do not have. Do well trained good dogs make mistake? YES but good trainer can and do often lessen the adverse results of that mistake.
    In comparing various breeds of dogs, we must look at their purpose and capacity, much like one would compare guns. If I wanted to go rabbit hunting in the underbrush, I would take a scent hound. If I wanted to go hunting mountain lions I would not take a sight hound, if I wanted to get rats out of my barn I would use a Jack Russell or other small very quick dog.
    If I wanted to hunt Mountain lions I would take a 30.06 rifle, or a gun of like capacity, I certainly would not take a 22 rifle. If I wanted to hunt squirrels, rats, or other small varmints, I would take a smaller caliber rifle. Certain caliber guns are designed for use in specific circumstances because of the power of maximum or minimal destruction of the target upon impact.
    So, The Pit Bull and other dogs of like innateness and capacity; in comparison to other dogs is (this may be over simplifying) a 44 magnum pistol; whereas the average dog is a 22 pistol. If the same surface of your shoulder is hit with a bullet from a 22 pistol, it is probably going to hurt, and may have residual adverse affect. If that same surface area is hit with a bullet from a 44 magnum; your shoulder will probably be destroyed. I am not an expert in guns but please trust my analogy.
    If there were a 44 magnum pistol, loaded, laying on a table….it is not dangerous!!! The gun does not think, interpret and react on its own as a dog does. A gun only becomes dangerous when someone picks it up, and is careless with it, or intentionally uses it,
    Thinking along these same lines of potential affect of various dogs; I posed a question to myself. The law enforcement agencies use the fear factor of a growling snarling lunging dog. So why do the police not use Pit Bulls in their every day work? Public law enforcement and other agencies use the Pit Bull and other like dogs in other canine work. Why not in the daily High Profile public duty such as crowd control or rooting out criminals in building or other such places they try to hide.
    Public Law enforcement uses other dogs, in High Profile Public work, to support their law enforcement efforts, so why not the pit bull? A dog growling and lunging at the leash is a powerful image and certainly is a deterrent to any hostile approach to that officer. If it were a Pit bull; with my perception and understanding of that dog; my fear and concern would be much greater. And let’s face it, I would not want to be in a crowd of people where a Pit Bull is on aggression leash and I am restricted from moving away from him. The pit bull is rarely used, if at all because it isn’t anywhere near as reliable to obedience as the other breeds used in law enforcement.
    In closing; Do a group of citizens with a vested interest; have the right to ask for protection of animals through legislation by restricting certain animals and where they may be housed and what materials and specification must be used for such housing? YES should animal owners be required to ensure their dogs remain on their property, and not place me and mine in peril? YES. Should Animal owners be held accountable for injury and mayhem their animals commit intentionally or unintentionally? YES
    Rights of Americans” it seems are no longer “inalienable”, but must now be legislated. That is not the way it should be. We have enough legislation; however irresponsible, ignorant, and selfish people require or cause more legislation. Therefore; we must be diligent and prudent in writing such legislation, and in requiring responsible ownership. Can we require owners of put bulls or certain other breeds to train them? No. There is always a new wave of dog owners on the horizon; the best we can do is to maintain a source of sound, logical proven correct information, which is presently readily available. They in turn can continue their learning through experience, and prove their own theory and MO. Sharing is caring.
    So’ I plead with any of you to share with me the manner of training which you use to secure the reliability of obedience of the dog(s) in question. I am sure if you can secure such a status, law enforcement would certainly incorporate them into their present High Profile Public canine program, in addition the various breeders would hail you’; and rightly so’ as a worthy and creditable person and trainer, for enhancing the public acceptance of their breed.

  • ok german shepherds are not dangerous i have 5 german shepherds and they are not mean or DANGEROUS they all saved my sun’s life he hit is head on the pool and was ding in the pool but my german shepherds Maya,Brock,max,kruger,and sasha saved his life and im love them whit all my hart and they were all abuse wen they were pups i love german shepherds and i always will and i wont tack this shit about german shepherds and i hope u wont too.oh and the top 10 mmost dangerous dog in the world is all of the above.if we all and if we all tack good car of them they will not be mean or dangerous so if u dont abuse them they wont attack u.and i have saved over 50 dogs in my life

  • Whoa Whoa Wait a sec…. Saint Bernards, Dalmations AND Chow Chows!?! That’s not right… Saint Bernards are gentle giants… Dalmations are friendly… And Chow Chows are yes, protective but not dangerous… German Shepards I can see cause theyre really vicious as police dogs sometimes…. Yes, and Great Danes… Gentle Giants too… (I’m srry if I do … to much lolz xP) But anyways these dogs are not vicious… No matter what stories u hear… Dogs are dangerous bc of abuse, neglet, and these fights and stuff. I watch Animal Planet, and I consider myself as a dog hippie lol xD some of my friends think so too… When I grow up, I want to become a vet. It’s very important 2 me to know this stuff. (It’s called Animal Planet and personal knowledge) xD

  • It goes to show that you do not know what you are talking about the name “Pit Bull” came from way bake in roman times they breed the Pit Bull to go into the ring and take down but not kill “Bulls” that were “pited” in rings that isw why the nose ring on the bulls. Please people do you AKC Breed work before you post a “peace of work” like this!!!!!

  • Here is a link for everyone who would like to know the CORRECT history of the American Pit Bull http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Pit_Bull_Terrier

    I personally think the list is WAY off. There are dogs missing like Bull Terrier; Boerboel; English Mastiff; Staffordshire; Bullmastiff… These are a couple that should definitely be on this list.

    I personally have a pure bred male Boerboel and a pure bred female Pit Bull….. and they are lovely dogs.

  • HUSKY!? Dangerous? No way?! I own one and they’re very playful and sweet. Of course, you need to train them at young age or else, they will get into bad habits. Yes, huskies nibble, but DON’T BITE. You also need experience if you going to own a husky. They’re very stuburn, but they are amazing!

  • I cannot believe that Boxer dogs are classed as ‘dangerous’. I own two boxer bitches (10 yrs old & 1 yr old) who have never behaved in an aggressive manner.

    The toughest things with the breed is to get them off the sofa!

  • Actually pit bulls aren’t that bad. They are strong so a re an ideal choice for a fighting dog. They are only trained to fight.
    You wouldn’t believe it but an Italian greyhound from my childhood (and the stupid thing is still alive) wanted.to kill me! Same with a min pin. I swear it had rabies 😛

  • I dont know why everyone has to put pitbulls as #1. I have owned 3 pits and none of them was ever vicious. I have a chihuahua that would bite you before any of my dogs.

  • Why no tibitan mastiffs ? And for most peoples saying pitbull this puttbull that.. Please.. It IS a dangerious dog. If it bites you. you will get seriously hurt. If a small dog breed bite you. you will also get hurt. but not dangeriously hurt.. So therefor its dangerious. Dogs is animals. Like all others.. You can teach a lion and a tiger to be with you. a Horse or a raccoon. Whatsoever they are still animals. And they might ( MIGHT) no matter who taught them, be dangerious. Like people. they can change Real quick into something else then what you are used to.. So now im not saying pit-bulls where made to fight or not. Or saints bernard is a killer. But if you think about it. Just think, Even though its taught not to fight taught please and be gentle. if someone jumps into your home , these dogs could kill him. While a small dog breed wouldn be able to do so. THAT is what makes it dangerious. DANGERIOUS is not same to DEADLY. So. Stop the bitch fighting about what you got at your home. If one day your dog is the one it clicks for in the brain after 8 years of nothing what so ever happening and your kids brain got sqeezed out his ear. Dont cry and say the dog is insane. it is “your mistake ” .. NOT

  • The Pit Bull is an animal and like other Big Dogs of like capacity they are subject to good training. There are approximately 77 million dogs in the U.S.A. Every one of these animals; are capable of thinking, perceiving, interpreting and reacting without our input or direction. Although we can and do train our animals to respond only to our personal directive
    A dog is like a small child; and we must constantly be aware of what they are doing and thinking if we are to keep them from harm’s way. Both will learn with or without our input so there must be a knowledgeable strong leader to protect and train them, without that leadership,respect and obedience will not happen. Respect is not an innate attribute of a dog or a child; it must be learned and earned. A dog or child who does not respect humans becomes empowered and becomes the leader in that relationship.
    Aggression in any breed is a concern. With Pit Bulls, and other like dogs of like capacity the consequences of an attack is paramount. I do not trust any person or animal as individuals, until they have proven trustworthy. I give both the same respect I would give a person with a gun in their hand, that being I do not place myself in a position where that persons carelessness will cause me harm.
    Safety in handling dogs can only come from recognizing, understanding, learning, and using the mediums of communication the dog uses which, are Visual, that being physical movement of their extremities individually or in correlation, therefore we must be in a position to see the communications, such as the dog’s tail and/or ear movement, their body frame. Sound, that being the levels of barking, growls, whines, moans, therefore we must be in a position to hear the communication, and Tactile, that being; physical touch, therefore we must be in a position to feel the communication, such as the dog pulling on the leash while I am walking him. The dog’s communication conveys his intent or feeling toward something which has got his attention, be it animal, vegetable or mineral.
    We breed dogs to develop certain innate features/traits. The Pit Bull and other dogs of like capacity were bred for the purpose of deterring threats by aggressive means. These traits remain in the dog today, although the average person having these dogs today, do not own or need them for the original purpose of breeding. The “need” has turned to a “desire.” Average owners are ignorant of and lack respect for the breeds capacity, training limits, and unreliability as regards obedience. Does this make the Pit Bull a BAD DOG? NO! It makes them dog with traits, just like a sight hound verses a Scent hound. They are both dogs, but have capacities and limits that must be respected. Are there exceptions? YES.
    An Obedient, reliable dog follows the handlers command, even though it does not want to. This means when there is a threat, or other stimulus which incites the dog to revert back to his “innate state” of survival; your “training” which the dog learned to trust, will surface and override his natural instincts to fight, flight, or chase. This type of training requires dedication, which I find the majority and average dog owners do not have.
    In comparing various breeds of dogs, we must look at their purpose and capacity, much like one would compare guns. For example; if there were a 44 magnum pistol, loaded, laying on a table….it is not dangerous!!! The gun does not think, interpret and react on its own as a dog does. A gun only becomes dangerous when someone picks it up, and is careless with it, or intentionally uses it,
    The Pit Bull and other like dogs of like capacity in comparison to other dogs is (this may be over simplifying) a 44 magnum pistol; whereas the average dog is a 22 pistol. If the same surface of your shoulder is hit with a bullet from a 22 pistol, it is probably going to hurt, and may have residual adverse affect. If that same surface area is hit with a bullet from a 44 magnum; your shoulder will probably be destroyed. I am not an expert in guns but please trust my analogy.
    Thinking along these same lines of potential affect of various dogs; I posed a question to myself. The law enforcement agencies use the fear factor of a growling snarling lunging dog. So why do the police not use Pit Bulls in their every day work? The police use other dogs, in high public profile, to support their law enforcement efforts, so why not the pit bull? A dog growling and lunging at the leash is a powerful image and certainly is a deterrent to any hostile approach to that officer. If it were a Pit bull; with my perception and understanding of that dog; my fear and concern would be much greater. The pit bull is rarely used because it isn’t anywhere near as reliable to obedience as the other breeds used in law enforcement. And let’s face it, I would not want to be in a crowd of people where a Pit Bull is on aggression leash and I am restricted from moving away from him.
    In closing; Do a group of citizens with a vested interest; have the right to ask for protection of animals through legislation by restricting certain animals and where they may be housed and what materials and specification must be used for such housing? YES Should animal owners be required to ensure their dogs remain on their property, and not place me and mine in peril? YES. Should Animal owners be held accountable for injury and mayhem their animals commit intentionally or unintentionally? YES
    Rights of Americans” it seem are no longer “inalienable”, but must now be legislated. That is not the way it should be. We have enough legislation; however irresponsible, ignorant, and selfish people require or cause all of us to suffer more legislation. Therefore; we must be diligent and prudent in writing such legislation, and in requiring responsible ownership. Can we require owners of put bulls or like dogs of like capacity; to train their animals’ NO”, but those owners should suffer the consequences of their poor or lacking training or control of such dogs.
    With every group of NEW” dog owners there comes ignorant, this will never change. But some owners recognize their responsibility and maintain control of and train the animals. However, I think there some that must eat Bowl of Stupid everyday………… because they and others like them keep missing the point. That point being….they, you, and I are responsible for any injury mayhem our dogs cause. And no matter who you are, or how much money one may be awarded as a result of for an encounter with BIG DOGS…..there is no bringing back to live of a person; adult or child, family or stranger, or replacing an eye scars, not to mention the fear the victim holds of other dogs, from that moment on.

  • I dobermans are dangerous IF YOU ARE AFRAID OF BEING LICKED TO DEATH! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!! ROTFL!!!

    I have 2 dobeclowns. I didn’t see them on the list so it’s all good! 🙂

  • I’m not a fan of small dogs in general. They do have a place in many many homes and are great companions for older people who are unable to get out and exercise much or those who are on the go a lot. We all have our personal preferences. Some smaller dogs do require a lot of exercise though. Jack Russell terriers and Beagles for example are very high energy. There are many small dogs who have a Napoleon complex. I did a search out of pure curiosity and sure enough there are several links that discuss this issue. Just like short men who lack self-esteem, shrimpy dogs may feel they have something to prove. Just sayin’…Look up “small dogs with napoleon complex.”

    There are studies out there that indicate that most people are less likely to go to the ER or see a doctor if bitten by a little dog as they are embarrass by the fact. It is more dramatic if you will to say they were attacked by a pitbull/rottie/doberman etc.. and fought it off of them. Think about it. A man goes into the ER and says, “I was attacked by a pack of poodles.” or “A shitz tzu came out of nowhere and tore me up!” Not as dramatic and rather embarrassing to some of those with inflated egos.

    I have to run. I have dobeslober all over me. DAGNG!!! They are such loves! 😛

  • OMG! I just had to read like 5 comments to get tired of the retarded owners of pits, rotts, etc
    it’s always the same stupid people!! who say…. “aww but my pit is an angel, it would never hurt anyone”
    aww well you know what I think?? I think the only reason you buy a pit is to b all like “yeah! my dog is soooo badass and would beat the hell out of your Chihuahua” but when it kills a child “but I never thought it would do such a thing! they told me Chihuahuas were more aggressive!”

    • hey elsy, i believe all dogs are born nice.it is all about how the owner treats it.Pretend you were a animal thats owner yelled and beat it,i know that if i were that animal i would just get tired of that and turn around and i would attack.Plase just take this into consideration.

    • Yeah tell that to the owner of the five Labs that killed my sister’s Mastiff puppy and her elderly Pit Bull who was a therapy dog. The owner said that his Labs were “so sweet and clam and playful and would never hurt a fly!”
      Yeah sure! Those monsters ripped Remy the Pit Bull apart like a Ragdoll and they tore off Sammy the Mastiff’s head! Does this mean all Labs are dangerous? No it does not as a matter of fact my sister now owns yet another elderly Pit Bull, a three-legged Presa Canario and a Black Lab. Those five Labs were just a pack of inbred dumbass dogs the owner didn’t even bother training. The owner was sent to jail the next year for raping and killing his estranged wife so she wouldn’t take his money in the divorce! I am glad those five particular labs are dead. Does this mean that all the other dog breeds you hate are dangerous? No it does not! Does this mean that there are dangerous dogs that belong to the breeds you hate? Yes there are! I have been bitten, chased and charged by many “sweet dog breeds”. I was jumped on from behind by an Australian Shepherd at a park. The owner thought it was funny and cute but I was so pissed off that I wanted to bash the dog’s head in. This same person warned me that a couple had showed up at the park with two Rottweilers, a Pit Bull and a German Shepherd Dog. Those dogs however didn’t run around pouncing on other people and getting on people’s nerves. All four of the dogs interacted with people and other dogs without being to energetic and without aggression. The woman who owned the Aussie was later sued after he dog killed a miniature horse foal and attacked the horse’s owners in the process. Thank goodness the dog was put down instead of being given “the cuddly breed pass”. People need to research breeds before they get them and they need to raise and train their dogs! Small dog owners especially the majority of small dog owners who let their dogs get away with everything! I have never been harmed by any of these “dangerous dog breeds” but I have come across mean “sweet dog breeds”. Do I hate certain dog breeds? No I do not but I don’t really like small dogs that much. I’m also not so keen on the dog breeds that make the most popular pet list either because most of them are overbred or as a result screwed up. Before you go out bashing people for their selection of dogs take a good look at yourself. If you own a Poodle people will say “Oh figures! No wonder you’re such an annoying snob.” If you won a Chihuahua people might call you “Wannebe Rich Bitch. You think your Paris Hilton or some other annoying celebrity. What a faker.” A dog is not a status symbol a dog is a worker, a companion and a member for the family. All dogs deserve t be loved for their personality not hated because of their breed.

      P.S.

      People like you disgust me.

  • You chat a bag of shit, every single dog can turn around and over power the owner if it wanted to. The reason some are DANGEROUS is how they are bred from puppies what life was like before becoming a pet there mum and dads temperment and apart from all you say a husky and malamutes and dalmations are all dangerous have your ever done any research on these breeds becuse this lists of dogs looks the same on the prev. site i have been on.

  • I own a Rottweiler/Lab mix. He HATES water, doesn’t know how to swim (well we’ve never seen him swim so we don’t really know), and when I say the word “Squirrel-ies” (a word I made up) he runs to the door and looks up into the trees. It’s SOOOO cute. He also runs into cabinets. He sounds really vicious, doesn’t he? (If you hadn’t guessed, that last question was sarcastic)

  • Do you even remotely know about dogs???Dalmations,ST. Benards, Great Dane , Alaskan malamute, siberian husky are not even remotely as dangerous to be in this list i agre this is nonsense its unbelievable the things people write and publish about breeds without knowing which is why so many breeds are criticized so much if you dont know what you write do the dogs a favor dont write anything at all