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Most Dangerous Dogs in the World

by Anastasia
Beware of the Dog Sign

Credit: Mandee Sears (via Flickr)

Note: This post was originally published on April 1, 2009. It has since been updated with a new introduction and further background on the history of dangerous dogs. Our original author’s list by breed can still be found below.

What makes one dog breed get a reputation for being more dangerous than others? Should you be more cautious around specific breeds? And does a dog’s breed even matter, or is it always a case of bad training?

Let’s explore some of the world’s most dangerous dogs, what makes us consider certain dog breeds to be dangerous, and role and history of dog training in building these reputations.

Dangerous Dogs (by Design?)

There are a number of reasons people tend to think of certain dog breeds as more dangerous than others. Not all reasons hold the same validity (hard statistics versus personal experiences for example). But they can play an important role in our understanding of these animals and our discussion about what might make some more dangerous than others.

Here are some of the reasons we tend to consider certain dogs to be the most dangerous dog breeds:

  • There are more reported incidences of dog bites and serious injuries from some breeds (this is one of the big reasons pit bulls are considered the most dangerous dog in some municipalities, even requiring special insurance if you want to have one in some areas).
  • The sheer size of some breeds can increase that perceived “danger factor.” While many of the largest breeds are known for their calm temperaments, the danger has to do with the potential for more serious injuries if those dogs happen to attack or even accidentally injure someone.
  • Some dogs are seen as dangerous because they were literally designed to be seen that way over the course of history. For example, we’re used to seeing German Shepherds used as police dogs. We’re used to seeing breeds such as Rottweilers and Doberman Pinschers being trained as guard dogs. And we’re used to the stories of American Pit Bull Terriers being trained for dog fighting.
  • Another big thing that affects our opinions of dog breeds is our personal experience with them and anecdotal stories we hear from others who have had either positive or negative experiences with certain types of dogs.

Let’s focus more on that last example, as I believe it can have the most impact.

How Our Personal Experiences Affect Our Views of Dog Breeds

Whether it’s right or wrong for us to judge a dog breed based on our limited experiences and the stories we hear about them, it’s something most of us do on some level (myself included). So I’d like to share some personal stories and how they’ve affected me (or not affected me how you might think).

In our comments on the original list we saw this. For example, we had people saying pit bulls aren’t dangerous because their own experiences with the breed have been pleasant. Others shared experiences on the other side of the spectrum.

Personally I come in somewhere in the middle. I’m not naive enough to think that breed alone makes all pit bulls dangerous or more vicious than other dogs. But I’m also not naive enough to ignore the evidence that this breed has a history of causing more frequent and more serious injuries than most, if not all, others.

Clearly the breed plays some role. Some breeds lean toward different temperaments, or have different loyalties (such as being great with their own families but naturally suspicious of strangers or other animals or even small children, who have less self-restraint than adults).

Personal experience is also a factor though. My brother has a small dog. He took the dog outside at his apartment building into the parking lot. Another neighbor was outside with their pit bull. It wasn’t on a leash (which was required there, but going unleashed isn’t terribly uncommon around here). By all measures the dog would have seemed like a normal, calm family pet. Until it saw my brother’s dog. It immediately charged at them and grabbed his dog by the throat (there was no provocation, no unusual noise, and they were across the lot — not close to the pit bull’s owner in any way). My brother was able to rescue his dog by lifting the pit bull and literally prying its mouth open (which, by the way, is a stupid thing to do — please don’t ever follow that example). The dog let go and his dog was okay after being treated for its injuries. The pit bull then latched onto my brother’s arm though. Again, he was okay after being treated, but the wound wasn’t insignificant. It could have been far worse.

That puts me in that middle ground territory I mentioned before. Personal experience with this breed is terrible. There is no sign that this dog was trained to attack or fight. Its owner seemed to be caught completely off-guard. It just snapped at the sight of a smaller dog. That kind of sudden reaction is far from unheard of with this breed.

But that said, I don’t fault an entire breed (this case pit bulls actually including three different breeds) for the actions of that single dog. The lack of predictability of some breeds would make them “more dangerous” in my view, almost as much as poor training and bad behavior by an owner (like allowing any breed with known issues with children or other animals to run free without a leash).

This is far from the only example I could give. Saint Bernards are also sometimes cited as some of the most dangerous dogs. But they’re also known for being calm-tempered and being good with kids. It’s their fierce loyalty that can be an issue.

A family member had one years ago. That dog was a great dog for most of its life. It even helped to stop a burglar in the family’s building. But years later it lunged at another family member who the dog knew for its entire life. They came to visit, and out of the blue the dog lunged and went for her eye. She’s still terrified of the breed to this day (and understandably so after an experience like that). We can’t explain the unprovoked attack. It might have been a breeding issue. The dog might have been having a bad day in some way. We just don’t know. I understand her fear of the breed. But it’s not one I hold myself as a result — perhaps because I didn’t see it first-hand.

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Some people find my dog’s underbite to be intimidating. But I know this is just her smiling after eating her favorite treat (with crumbs still all over her face and the floor). But even happy pups can be dangerous in their own ways.

I personally own a mixed breed dog — border collie mixed with a lab. At this stage in her life, I would also consider her to be a dangerous dog, especially around children. She is in no way violent. She’s great with cats and other dogs. But she’s still at that point where she’s young, wants to play all the time, and she doesn’t realize her own size or strength. The hyper aspect is breed-specific. Both labs and border collies can be very high strung, especially in their first couple of years. Neighbors and family members don’t want her playing with their tiny dogs, and I think that’s understandable. And I wouldn’t take her out to play with small children for fear that she’d accidentally hurt them by jumping up or knocking them over as she tries to play. Being dangerous isn’t always a case of being vicious, and that’s why so much falls onto the owner. It’s our responsibility to make sure our dogs aren’t put into situations where they’re more likely to cause harm.

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It’s this little guy that my guests should be most concerned about. He can be more vicious than any dog I’ve personally known. He mauled the last stranger who tried to rub that tummy (never, ever, ever pet an animal you don’t know without asking the owner first; she tried even after being warned).

If you’ve had experiences that have shaped your own views of what makes for a dangerous dog breed, let us know in the comments. Tell us what happened and whether or not you think it’s a fair way to judge a larger group of dogs based on the action (or actions) you’ve seen first-hand, and why.

Now let’s get to our original list of some of the seemingly most dangerous dogs, based on breeds. Now that you know why certain breeds have earned their “most dangerous dogs” reputations, can you think of others that might also have a similar history? Tell us in the comments.

Every person that I know deeply cares about his or her pets. They are their best friends. They tenderly love each other. Sometimes they eat together, sleep together, and go for walks together. I’m more of a cat person, but I can’t sit still when I see little puppies or big dogs with big soft fur. I want to hug them, play with them, and give them some of my love and tenderness too. I’ve also seen many adult dogs of different breeds worth praise and true admiration. They are clever, sociable, and funny when you want to play; calm and patient with kids. And they’re something I can’t credit to cats: they are faithful.

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Personally, I don’t know any dog that would bite without warning or just snap. It’s my firm belief that behavior of the dog doesn’t depend on its breed so much as it being the right training and the “master” that matter. In my opinion, humans are most often responsible for dangerous dogs. That said, there might be some truth in the idea that some breeds have more unstable temperaments than others, but knowing this we should never provoke them.

Think for a minute and analyze your own life. Are we always polite? I can think of several situations when I would have gladly slapped a man in the face, but thank God I’m weak enough and I can control myself (at least I think that I can). Now think about animals. They have instincts too, and they may forget about good manners. It’s not as if they understand them in the same ways we do.

It’s also important for dog owners to protect both other people and their dogs from unexpected circumstances and thus the unpleasant situations. For example, when going outside, they could always use a dog-lead and a muzzle. They could be careful and not let the dog play on its own without a leash, especially when there are other people around. When you have a dog, you become forever responsible for the animal you’ve trained and tamed.

In any case, it’s good to know what breeds of dogs might be most dangerous, just to keep yourself safe. Sometimes the danger in a dog isn’t even a nasty personality, but a matter of them not knowing their own strength. Even though I personally still find it hard to believe that breed alone deems a dog “dangerous,” you never know what a dog’s owner has taught it. The research into the most dangerous dogs included below was performed by the American Veterinary Medical Association, the CDC, and the Humane Society of the United States. We’ll start with least dangerous of the bunch. Sorry, but there won’t be any terrifying photos today.

Dalmatian

Origin: Balkans, India, Middle Ages
Weight: 40-70 lbs
Height: 20-24 inches

Dalmatians are active and energetic dogs, loving to be outdoors. They are very playful and love running.

There’s still no definite info about what this breed was originally bred for. This is the first dotted breed in Europe, Asia and Africa. They were serving as warriors, hunters, and shepherds before finally becoming the symbol of the English fireman.

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Boxer

Origin: Germany, 1850-ies
Weight: 50-64 lbs
Height: 20-25 inches

The boxer is a very strong “square” dog. Boxers love to walk, but the owner should never forget the leash. It’s also better to refrain from aggressive games. Still, boxers recognize all members of the family and can play well with the children.

The boxer breed was bred in feudal Germany and dates back to the line of bulldogs that existed in Europe in the XVI century. Its ancestors were used in hunting wild boars and other big wild animals. The first puppy in a new breed was given a name “Box.” Boxers qualities, such as their strength, were highly valued by farmers and shopkeepers.

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Presa Canario

Origin:Canary Islands, Africa
Weight: 100-125 lbs
Height: 25-26 inches

The Presa Canario hails from the Canary Islands, where the dogs were trained for hunting and for war. During the 18th century, English traders and merchants came to the Canary Islands, bringing with them their working and gladiator dogs, notably the Mastiff of England and the Bulldog. Englishmen also brought with them their traditions of pit fighting for which their breeds and the island dogs were inevitably mixed and eventually bred to produce the ultimate fighter. Nowadays the breed is used for guarding and the handling and driving of cattle.

The dogs of this breed can be gentle and noble with their families, showing great affection to their owners, and being suspicious of strangers.

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Saint Bernard

Origin: Switzerland, Middle Ages
Weight: 110-180 lbs
Height: 24-29 inches

Saint bernards are amazingly big and easygoing dogs, but due to their impressive size they can look a bit awkward. They are quiet and peaceful, love children and are not built for active and rapid games. Saint bernards will need all of your attention, so if you spend days in the office, this dog is not for you. They are tremendously strong and, of course, they require a good bit of space.

Most likely, the ancestor of the Saint Bernard was the Alpine Mastiff, which was a pretty aggressive breed. They were used as working dogs and scouts. Nowadays they are considered excellent home companions.

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Great Dane

Origin: Germany, Middle Ages – XIX century
Weight: 90-120 lbs
Height: 27-32 inches

Great danes are beautiful and majestic animals, with a gentle and loving nature. They love to play with children and participate in all family events and activities, especially in the outdoors. They are happy to go for a walk and don’t mind the company of other dogs, and despite their gigantic size Great Danes can even feel quite at home in a city.

In the middle ages, these dogs were used for dog fighting and for hunting big mammals.

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Chow Chow

Origin: China, antiquity
Weight: 40-65 lbs
Height: 18-22 inches

The chow chow is an independent dog often focused only on its own needs. Chow chows need constant physical activity and communication, even if they don’t seem to like being disturbed much.

Chow chows were bred for hunting and helping shepherds.

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Doberman Pinscher

Origin: Germany, XIX century
Weight: 65-90 lbs
Height: 26-28 inches

Doberman pinschers (often just called dobermans) are dogs that were originally bred to protect and defend. It is important to avoid any type of aggressive play and struggle with these dogs, instead letting the games be guided to develop the doberman’s intelligence. Even though they aren’t small dogs, dobermans can adapt to life in a city and become a perfect companion for the experienced, physically active owner.

This breed was bred in Germany by Louis Doberman who decided to combine the qualities of guard dogs and and the terrier. Luis was a policeman and needed a dog that would devotedly defend its owner.

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Alaskan Malamute

Origin: North America, ancient times
Weight: 80-110 lbs
Height: 23-28 inches

The malamute is a friendly dog, but it has rather an independent temper. It’s better to keep this dog in a village, far from the city. Sometimes violent and energetic, they constantly need to move or play. It’s a working breed where the dogs are used to a cold climate, so if you don’t live in the deep north, make your malamute a nice playground as they are always in need of physical activity.

The name was given to the breed by a local tribe which used the malamute to transport goods on a sleigh.

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Husky

Origin: Siberia, ancient times
Weight: 35-55 lbs
Height: 20-24 inches

The training of a husky is a complicated thing, and this dog is not recommended for beginning dog owners. Initially these dogs were used to transport goods on a sleigh. Not afraid of cold weather, they’re very active and loving dogs. The love to get together with other members of their breed and howl at the moon.

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German Shepherd

Origin: Germany, XIX century
Weight: 70-85 lbs
Height: 22-26 inches

German shepherds are very beautiful dogs, distinguished from other breeds by their reliable and obedient temper. They are in need of constant and serious physical activity though, and they seem to give preference to long walks and active games.

Originally (as obvious from the name), the dogs were used for grazing sheep. They are great home guards and often participate in programs for the disabled.

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Rottweiler

Origin: Germany, 1820-ies
Weight: 85-110 lbs
Height: 23-27 inches

Rottweilers are powerful dogs with strong jaws, primarily meant to protect. The breed was bred especially for that purpose. They often don’t like strangers and other dogs — they are guards at heart, and the dog owner should always remember that.

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Pit bull

Origin: US, XIX century
Weight: 30-55 lbs
Height: 18-22 inches

The pit bull was bred especially for dog fighting and, sad as it is, they’re still used for this purpose today.

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Photos source: www.flickr.com.

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1,044 comments

nmn March 26, 2011 - 8:55 pm

i have a rottie and a pitbull and they are the nicest dogs in the world i love them so much they are my life + my lab and my shih zu

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K April 1, 2011 - 4:46 am

To be fair, I have not read all the comments so am unsure as to whether this has been mentioned previously. Many people confuse American Pitbulls, American Staffordshire Terriers and Staffordshire Bull Terriers (English). The Staffy, from England, is a family dog with a very bad reputation due to it having physical characteristics of the American Pit Bull. Due to this misconception it is important to separate it from the other two breeds I have mentioned above. I bring this up as the picture or the Black and White “Pit Bull” in this article is blatantly an English Staffordshire Bull Terrier. If possible, could the picture of the English Staffy be removed from this page please?

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Ali Smith April 6, 2011 - 6:18 pm

Pit Bulls are not dangerous AT ALL! Just watch the show Pit Boss (on TLC) and youll see that it is the people that make them dangerous. My dad says that he probably wouldnt want one but they are one of the most loving breeds of dogs you could own, the guy on the show has 4 and one is a dog to help handicapped people and it is just the most calm dog i have ever seen. And i know that it says that Boxers arent that dangerous but they shouldnt even be on this list! I ahve a boxer and the only time she would be aggressive is if she saw someone hurting me or my family. We got her when i was 5 years old and she was just a puppy, ahe would never hurt anything on purpose, she gets really hyper sometimes and will jump but if she knocks you down she would probably just lick you to death. She is great around cats, other dogs AND SMALL KIDS! She has been around numerous 1-3 year olds and she will just let them do whatever.

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Tracey April 8, 2011 - 1:27 am

I really disagree with throwing Boxers in with this mix. I have had several of the breeds you featured , and in fact have a German Shepherd Dog and a boxer right now. Trust me, Boxers just dont belong in that group at all.

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maria bridges April 11, 2011 - 12:05 pm

can i ask how a boxer is dangerous ? yes they were dangerous when they were first bred but now the daft as a bottle of pop. im 18 and i have had 5 boxers in my lifetime 3 boys and 2 bitchs and none have turned on me in fact i have never heard of a boxer been agressive unless provoked by intruders. they are a loyal dog who are brilliant with children i would not dream of having any other dog if i had children.

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amit April 12, 2011 - 3:34 am

oups some dogs are very dangerous dogs

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Alex April 13, 2011 - 7:48 am

I love all dogs
I used have a bernese mountain dog called Maddie but when she died we didnt get another dog for a while but when we did we got a Black Labrador and his name is Diesal, he’s really cute and a very hugable dog.

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gurjeet singh April 15, 2011 - 7:07 am

this dog is not too dangerous,pit bull is the world’s no.1 dangerous dog see on you tube…..

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stacy April 16, 2011 - 12:04 pm

What the hell Huskies are here lol.. tmine was wandered with thiefs in the garden.

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Brandy April 16, 2011 - 9:30 pm

Dane and st Bernard? Did you make this up…I think you did.Danes despite there size are one of the most gentle breeds in the world,I would leave my children un attended with our Dane before I would any chewawa (small but temperamental).Shame on you for enforcing a fear of size rather than temperament.Both breeds have been bread for protection and are courageous and noble and would give there lives to protect.My Dane Mastiff mix is the perfect family pet she is large enough to scare away any unwanted guest and gentle enough to trust with ducklings and nurse kittens.

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Tailor April 16, 2011 - 9:31 pm

Okay I’m disapointed. Nobody cares if your dog is friendly or not can I can very well say that at any moment your dog can turn on you or anyone around you. And don’t you dare try to say I am wrong cause just yesterday I was attacked by my neighbors boxer. The dog had lived there for years and knew who I was but I was just walking home and the dog ran over and attacked me. I have no use of my left arm at this very moment. And people stop saying the pitbull is not dangerous, cause it very well is. I own one and I can not be like you and say she is all sweet and lovable, to my family? Yes she is but have no doubt that she would attack anyone whom posed even a minor threat to someone of my family, cause I know that she would. Dogs are very unpredictable cause guess what people! They have a mind of their own! We don’t get to choose what they do cause either they do it or they don’t. And these are just dog breeds that have more of the temperment to attack more than others. But I’m not saying that a lab or a golden retriver will not attack someone either cause they well might. The is no control of what you dog might do. Thanks for reading.

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anthony stewart April 25, 2011 - 1:29 pm

If you don’t respect their needs and show quiet leadership without abuse, they won’t respect you. If you allow them to think they are the pack leaders by subtle ways, they will act independently out of defense or aggression. If you don’t understand them, they will appear to have a mind of their own. Go seek the Dog Whisperer videos and choose to understand and show calm leadership for a faithful obedient companion.

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veer April 17, 2011 - 11:09 am

ROTWEILLERS ARE THE STRONGEST ONE WAY ORE THE OTHER

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abbie April 23, 2011 - 3:48 am

2 me a rotty is a brilll dog u can use it both ways like ours gaurd outside but when it is let in its fantstic with the kids now its the only dog i probly will have all the ball mstive

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Glen April 24, 2011 - 12:52 pm

Dogs are a relict of the pre-industrial era, when most people lived in rural areas. Today, their existence is very questionable. Becaue in most cases they’re only used as a pet to cuddle and play with. It’s like some fetish of the owners, who enjoy having power over another creature. This is sick.

Dogs don’t belong in urban areas. And I claim that they don’t belong in human societies at all anymore, unless they’re not trained for special purpose (rescue dogs, dogs for disabled, etc). Dogs are dangerous, especially for children.

I live in Germany. Germany has one of the lowest numbers of pet dogs. Yet, still every year about 2-3 children get bitten to death by dogs and about a dozen get severely injured to a level of life-threatening condition and mutilation respectively. And these are only the children. There are far more people in total numbers who get injured by dogs.

Two out of three attacks come from dogs who were considered to be well-behaved and well-raised, i.e. to be harmless. None of these attacks could be foreseen by any of their owners. Dogs are predators and they will always be. They’re not only an annoyance to the public, but also to wild animals, such as deer. Dog owners mostly do not obey the duty to walk their dog on the leash in the woods.

It is far more important to protect children and the wildlife animals, than endorsing the fetish of pet owners. Also, keep in mind that, for example in Germany, dog owners spend 5 billion Euro per year for their dogs. Imagine they would spend this money for charity or wildlife preservation programs. It is so easy to spot the hypocrisy in the pet owners behaviour. They are not lovers of animals. It’s just the opposite. It’s all about themselves. Pet owners are selfish people who take advantage of pet animals in order to satisfy their fetish, to have a ‘friend’ (a toy).

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Audrey April 24, 2011 - 10:26 pm

I agree that it depends on the dog and what it has been taught and trained not the breed

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Andrew April 25, 2011 - 9:26 pm

for me i think pitbulls are thee best dogs to every have. I have a rednose pitbull, and he is thee biggest baby every…hehe i love it, but anyways 🙂

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Z April 26, 2011 - 3:12 am

You were a bit wrong on quite a few dogs histories and a little off on other’s personality traits. That was somewhat upsetting.
Luis Doberman wasn’t a police officer. He was a tax collector and sometimes a night watchmen.

For Dalamations, did you wonder why they became mascots for the fire dept.? They were actually used to guard the horses and the carriages and clear paths. Actually vicious tendencies were bred into them and encouraged at least during this phase. Add in that a lot of people didn’t know about their tendency towards blindness and you have instability.

The Chow is “aloof” but not selfish. They are extremely devoted to owners they respect and will do anything for them. Many world leaders have owned Chows including Sigmund Freud.

Rottweilers were originally bred not as a guard dog as you are implying. Actually, they are a herding breed. And sometimes their side job was as a makeshift draft horse. They were only used as guard dogs later in life during WWI and WWII. So that isn’t their “heart”

So yea, if you’re going to write about dangerous dog breeds. Please do your research properly. Either that or just stick to being a cat lover…

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jack April 26, 2011 - 3:21 pm

Enjoy a “CUP of Blended T’s” With Your Dog and Enhance Both Your Lives

Training dogs is about Communication; it is an intentional act to modify their behavior.
Communication’ is an intentional or unintentional act which conveys information. Clear’ intentional communication is the essence of any enduring relationship.
Whether human or animal there are three innate mediums of communication: visual, sound and tactile. When it comes to training animals…, communication …..When understood, leads to predictability.
The sound’ medium of communication (For the most part the spoken word) of humans is complex and perplexing to learn; as we have so many tongues and dialects spoken through out the world. Therefore animals are not able to understand the intimacy we can create with words.
However animals cannot comprehend our sounds of spoken words to the aforementioned degree, therefore we minimize use of our individual spoken word communication and maximize our use of Visual and Tactile communication. However we do embellish the sounds of our spoken word with tone, energy and when possible conjoin them with communication in Visual and tactile. Animals easily recognize visual and tactile communication of nonthreatening, friendly, unfriendliness or hostility from other species as well as their own, such as a dog bearing its teeth and chasing a strange dog out of their yard, has does a burro to protect the sheep it is roaming with.
We humans are able and apt at learning to recognize signals in all three mediums of communication the animal’s uses to convey their intent to each other. We are so apt at reproducing their sounds of communication; that the animal thinks we are one of them; perhaps not to the profound intimacy as would be between two animals of the same species, but close enough in likeness that we can call that animal to us.
Dogs use the same signals in their communication, no matter where in the world they are located. I do not think it is possible for a normal dog to misinterpret the communications of another normal dog.
An interesting note; dogs are not able to lie. On the other hand, we humans are not only able, but apt at lying, misleading or deceiving each other; and, we do so using all three mediums of communication.
As a practicing trainer, I learned early on; in order to develop a mutually respectfully relationship with a positive, residual affect; the animal and I must experience each other face to face.
I want to communicate to the dog, my true intention; that being I mean him no harm. I in turn, will interpret his conduct looking for any behavior modification and determine if it is positive or negative. During the initial stages of our encounter, I consider his tolerance of my closeness a positive impact on his behavior.
During training; one of us (the dog) is teaching, the other (me) is training. However, we are both learning to trust. With mutual trust established; I enhance my efforts of ground training him; which is the foundation his performance training; in riding or driving as well as work in- hand or at liberty.
My nomadic life style, has allowed me to experience and learn from many people, and dogs. This opportunity led me to create an aphorism, titled: A CUP of Blended T’s for which I created the letters C. U. P. an acronym for Communication, Understanding, and Predictability. The Blended T’s, segment is stated below. I found keeping this in the forefront of my thinking, keeps me looking for new or more subtle communication of animals, as well as people.
The letter C = Communication’ through the mediums of Visual, Sound & Tactile, which also are three of the dogs’ five senses. The mediums of communication listed below are not prioritized. The first medium of communication is: visual I call it visual because one must use their eyes to understand the communication being conveyed to them by the body movement in whole or in part of the origin, as occurs with those of the deaf community when signing.
Dogs’ when communicating visually with but not limited to, their eyes, ears, bearing of their teeth, raising of their lips, movement of the head, tail, and the lowing and rising of their frame/body and over all demeanor . The signals may be presented individually or in correlation. This visual medium of communication is also similar to the hand signals a traffic cop uses when directing traffic. Using our entire body or using our extremities individually or in correlation; we are able to develop signals which we display to incite the dog to perform a certain action or movement. These signals, when presented consistently and frequently allow the dog to learn to respond with the action or movement we desire.
The second medium of communication is Sound. Dogs use various noises made with their breath flowing from the lungs, through the nose and mouth. The sound might be, a slight “whine/whimper, to low humming sound which increases to a growl, a yep which increases to a howl in pain or in letting other know where they are or perhaps calling for others to come to them, and the bark.ive alarm to his herd as to the presence of a threat. During training we use sounds (sit) to direct our dogs. Our dogs can just as easily be trained to sit’ when they hear other sounds, such as a whistle; if we consistently associate that sound with the act of sitting.
The third medium of communication is tactile: Tactile communication between dogs would be when a dog bumps another to incite it to play, or when they put their head on the top of another dogs back as a sign of dominance, or licking in or around the mouth
Another tactile communication is a “seeing eye” dog leading a blind person who is holding the harness handle. The dog’s movement is communicating a message to the person as to what the dog wants the person to do. When we pet and rub and scratch our dogs we are communicating peace, friendliness, which brings comfort.
Example of Tactile; if the guide dog of a blind person refuses to walk upon command; the dog could be telling the person there are dangerous or undesirable conditions ahead in which case the person will heed the dogs communication. Brail’ is another form of tactile communication; where in the reader must use their sense of touch with their finger tips upon an array of raised dots on a brail board. The arrangement of the dots, convey the message. Another application of tactile communication is when a man and woman holding each other while dancing; both are communicating in tactile.
U = Understanding: When we recognize, learn and understand the signals dogs uses to communicate; we know the generality of message they convey.
P = Predictability: This means when we observe the dog communicating, we are able to forecast the outcome of various circumstances and consequences.
Blended T’s = Training & Trust: The sequence is definitely training first, and if done humanely, kindly, consistently one will earn a certain amount of trust. Trust between an animal and a person is simply: willing participation in degrees without fear. Trust between animals and people come only from good training. I must mention the absence of fear, does not necessarily reflect the presence of trust. The Lion in the wild having never seen me certainly does not fear me; he may move away from me until he discovery what I am about.
The bottom line in training is; I am always training for more trust. In addition, remember both fear and trust are learned and earned.
Training is an intentional effort to modify a behavior. Training can be accomplished two ways. One way is face to face, where we train the animal to trust us. This training begins at the first encounter when both parties are present and aware of each other. With a psychologically sound dog; humane, good training will produce trust. With this trust I will train him first for obedience, and continue on for performance in herding, pulling, agility, and retrieving, hunting, search and rescue and guard work, both alarm and attack (I personally do not train dogs for Guard or Attack service.
The more I train him the more trust he will extend. The other way to train a dog is through Pavlov’s involuntary response to a stimulus. Where in, without the dog having ever been aware of my presence; I will train him to open a gate or lick something up. In either case he will develop trust for the environment……, but he will not develop trust for me; I wasn’t in his presences, so how could he.
In closing, may I suggest; while incorporating a “Cup of Blended T’s” will not make one a trainer, it certainly is a fundamental aspect of good training. Perhaps we should start every day with a “Cup of Blended T’S”
Footnote: Oder
Communication conveys information; therefore Oder’ is a medium of communication. However with humans it can be intentional or unintentional, with animal it is only unintentional.
With dogs Odor’ is a non-cognitive, biological, involuntary function that communicates status or presences, therefore it is unintentional communication, as is the message a lame horse (visually ) communicate to a predator or a bitch in heat (odor) conveys to a male dog.

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jack April 26, 2011 - 3:28 pm

Well said MR. Z Perhaps the person misstating information about dogs and their traits could;
Enjoy a “CUP of Blended T’s” and Enhance Both Your Lives

Training dogs is about Communication; it is an intentional act to modify their behavior.
Communication’ is an intentional or unintentional act which conveys information. Clear’ intentional communication is the essence of any enduring relationship.
Whether human or animal there are three innate mediums of communication: visual, sound and tactile. When it comes to training animals…, communication …..When understood, leads to predictability.
The sound’ medium of communication (For the most part the spoken word) of humans is complex and perplexing to learn; as we have so many tongues and dialects spoken through out the world. Therefore animals are not able to understand the intimacy we can create with words.
However animals cannot comprehend our sounds of spoken words to the aforementioned degree, therefore we minimize use of our individual spoken word communication and maximize our use of Visual and Tactile communication. However we do embellish the sounds of our spoken word with tone, energy and when possible conjoin them with communication in Visual and tactile. Animals easily recognize visual and tactile communication of nonthreatening, friendly, unfriendliness or hostility from other species as well as their own, such as a dog bearing its teeth and chasing a strange dog out of their yard, has does a burro to protect the sheep it is roaming with.
We humans are able and apt at learning to recognize signals in all three mediums of communication the animal’s uses to convey their intent to each other. We are so apt at reproducing their sounds of communication; that the animal thinks we are one of them; perhaps not to the profound intimacy as would be between two animals of the same species, but close enough in likeness that we can call that animal to us.
Dogs use the same signals in their communication, no matter where in the world they are located. I do not think it is possible for a normal dog to misinterpret the communications of another normal dog.
An interesting note; dogs are not able to lie. On the other hand, we humans are not only able, but apt at lying, misleading or deceiving each other; and, we do so using all three mediums of communication.
As a practicing trainer, I learned early on; in order to develop a mutually respectfully relationship with a positive, residual affect; the animal and I must experience each other face to face.
I want to communicate to the dog, my true intention; that being I mean him no harm. I in turn, will interpret his conduct looking for any behavior modification and determine if it is positive or negative. During the initial stages of our encounter, I consider his tolerance of my closeness a positive impact on his behavior.
During training; one of us (the dog) is teaching, the other (me) is training. However, we are both learning to trust. With mutual trust established; I enhance my efforts of ground training him; which is the foundation his performance training; in riding or driving as well as work in- hand or at liberty.
My nomadic life style, has allowed me to experience and learn from many people, and dogs. This opportunity led me to create an aphorism, titled: A CUP of Blended T’s for which I created the letters C. U. P. an acronym for Communication, Understanding, and Predictability. The Blended T’s, segment is stated below. I found keeping this in the forefront of my thinking, keeps me looking for new or more subtle communication of animals, as well as people.
The letter C = Communication’ through the mediums of Visual, Sound & Tactile, which also are three of the dogs’ five senses. The mediums of communication listed below are not prioritized. The first medium of communication is: visual I call it visual because one must use their eyes to understand the communication being conveyed to them by the body movement in whole or in part of the origin, as occurs with those of the deaf community when signing.
Dogs’ when communicating visually with but not limited to, their eyes, ears, bearing of their teeth, raising of their lips, movement of the head, tail, and the lowing and rising of their frame/body and over all demeanor . The signals may be presented individually or in correlation. This visual medium of communication is also similar to the hand signals a traffic cop uses when directing traffic. Using our entire body or using our extremities individually or in correlation; we are able to develop signals which we display to incite the dog to perform a certain action or movement. These signals, when presented consistently and frequently allow the dog to learn to respond with the action or movement we desire.
The second medium of communication is Sound. Dogs use various noises made with their breath flowing from the lungs, through the nose and mouth. The sound might be, a slight “whine/whimper, to low humming sound which increases to a growl, a yep which increases to a howl in pain or in letting other know where they are or perhaps calling for others to come to them, and the bark.ive alarm to his herd as to the presence of a threat. During training we use sounds (sit) to direct our dogs. Our dogs can just as easily be trained to sit’ when they hear other sounds, such as a whistle; if we consistently associate that sound with the act of sitting.
The third medium of communication is tactile: Tactile communication between dogs would be when a dog bumps another to incite it to play, or when they put their head on the top of another dogs back as a sign of dominance, or licking in or around the mouth
Another tactile communication is a “seeing eye” dog leading a blind person who is holding the harness handle. The dog’s movement is communicating a message to the person as to what the dog wants the person to do. When we pet and rub and scratch our dogs we are communicating peace, friendliness, which brings comfort.
Example of Tactile; if the guide dog of a blind person refuses to walk upon command; the dog could be telling the person there are dangerous or undesirable conditions ahead in which case the person will heed the dogs communication. Brail’ is another form of tactile communication; where in the reader must use their sense of touch with their finger tips upon an array of raised dots on a brail board. The arrangement of the dots, convey the message. Another application of tactile communication is when a man and woman holding each other while dancing; both are communicating in tactile.
U = Understanding: When we recognize, learn and understand the signals dogs uses to communicate; we know the generality of message they convey.
P = Predictability: This means when we observe the dog communicating, we are able to forecast the outcome of various circumstances and consequences.
Blended T’s = Training & Trust: The sequence is definitely training first, and if done humanely, kindly, consistently one will earn a certain amount of trust. Trust between an animal and a person is simply: willing participation in degrees without fear. Trust between animals and people come only from good training. I must mention the absence of fear, does not necessarily reflect the presence of trust. The Lion in the wild having never seen me certainly does not fear me; he may move away from me until he discovery what I am about.
The bottom line in training is; I am always training for more trust. In addition, remember both fear and trust are learned and earned.
Training is an intentional effort to modify a behavior. Training can be accomplished two ways. One way is face to face, where we train the animal to trust us. This training begins at the first encounter when both parties are present and aware of each other. With a psychologically sound dog; humane, good training will produce trust. With this trust I will train him first for obedience, and continue on for performance in herding, pulling, agility, and retrieving, hunting, search and rescue and guard work, both alarm and attack (I personally do not train dogs for Guard or Attack service.
The more I train him the more trust he will extend. The other way to train a dog is through Pavlov’s involuntary response to a stimulus. Where in, without the dog having ever been aware of my presence; I will train him to open a gate or lick something up. In either case he will develop trust for the environment……, but he will not develop trust for me; I wasn’t in his presences, so how could he.
In closing, may I suggest; while incorporating a “Cup of Blended T’s” will not make one a trainer, it certainly is a fundamental aspect of good training. Perhaps we should start every day with a “Cup of Blended T’S”
Footnote: Oder
Communication conveys information; therefore Oder’ is a medium of communication. However with humans it can be intentional or unintentional, with animal it is only unintentional.
With dogs Odor’ is a non-cognitive, biological, involuntary function that communicates status or presences, therefore it is unintentional communication, as is the message a lame horse (visually ) communicate to a predator or a bitch in heat (odor) conveys to a male dog.

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Xavier April 26, 2011 - 3:48 pm

Hello does anyone know what the Dogo Argentino Uhh yeah it was pronounsed the ultimate dog by NAT GEO. It was bred by the Martinez bro for 25 yeah it has the Great dane, Bull Mastif, Pitbull Terrier, English Bull Dog ,Great Pyrese , Boxer.

which the outcome was the fighting dog of Cardoba which was too aggressive for humans often when a male and female we put to mate they fought to the death instead. So the brothers added The english pointer, re-entered the Boxer and Mastiff,Irishwolfhound for instint, Dogue de Bordeaux for powerful jaws, Spanish Matsiff for power, and pit bull for fearlessness.

So the outcome was the dogo argentino a white dog with the head of a huge pitbull Size of a mastiff leaner ang hieght like a Great Dane Instint like a Irish wolf hound Friendliness of a Boxer fearlessness of a bull terrier and amazing sense of smell like a English Pointer.

so How what did the dog do well they hunted, One could kill an adult puma and a pack of three could kill 8 boar in a single hunt Soo why isn’t the Dogo Argentno such a popular dog. Beccause people are scared of its phyiscal capablilty dont beleive me Talk to Nat Geo and My 115Lb Dogo Argentino Juno.

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harsh April 28, 2011 - 12:36 am

your right mans fault not dog fault i think too :]

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Katherine May 5, 2011 - 2:00 pm

Pit Bulls were NOT bred for fighting. They were bred to be “nannies” for children. Maybe you should look into facts before being like other dumb Americans and bashing pits.

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Katherine May 5, 2011 - 2:03 pm

and to all of the people that believe that pits have a “locking” jaw. It’s not true. Do your research people.

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m morrris May 8, 2011 - 4:26 pm

got to say it is down to the owner, i have a dalmation and a malmut/husky (escuse my spellin) perfect dogs! they know im the boss thats the only way u can have a dog is to be the pack leader! got to add i have 3 children 4 and 3 years old and a 20week old baby! im very carefull and watch them with my kids id be stupid not to!!! x

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Hanson-Doggie-Kid May 9, 2011 - 6:29 pm

This Dogs are not all Aggressive Dogs,not all Dogs could be trained to be loving some have the instinct to be aggressive.
Just like teaching a Lion how to Love some day nature would teach it how to suck-lmao.

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Pradeep Singh May 10, 2011 - 7:18 am

i want very powerful and dangerous dog for sefty purpose

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nothing81 May 15, 2011 - 2:15 am

your comment above about wanting a dangerous and powerful dog for protection is exactly why [email protected]!*% list like this are made! your stupid and I see nothing but a sad life for good dog at the hands of total idiot. Also malamutes are one of the most gentle,loyal,and social dog breeds-they have to be or inuits would never get the arctic. same with huskys. Rottwieler where over breed for years,same with german shepards,st.bernards,and dobermanns. there’s so many holes in this “list” if I was the author I’d be more than embaressed-oH! wait their more of a cat person. *DO YOUR RESEARCH AND REMEMBER ANIMALS ARE NOT TOYS- THEY HAVE NEEDS AND IF YOU CAN MEET THEM DON’T GET IT*

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jack May 12, 2011 - 6:49 pm

I wrote this pertains to horses; but as a horse and dog trainer I know it applies the same for dogs
A “CUP of Blended T’s “
Before one may become a good trainer of horses or dogs, or any animal for that matter; they must understand that training is all about communication. In my relationship with animals, I discovered for myself the Three Innate Mediums of two-way communication common to all animals; which are Visual, Sound and Touch, which are in part, inter specie; perhaps not to the intimate level as is intra species, but the generality of a given message is clear.
This is the little thought of, but profoundly simple reason why people become good trainers and why good trainers become great trainers.
When I am in the presence of a horse; I am learning the signals with which he conveys information using the three innate mediums of two-way communication. He is the teacher; granted, his teaching role may be unintentional, but that does not lessen my role as an intentional and willing student. Upon learning his signals I begin training him to learn mine. The results are three mediums of two-way communications.
Read on and you will discover the very heart of maintaining enduring relationships with animals.
If you have “Horse in the Heart” you are one of ”US in EQUUS” … we are a family that learns through sharing. I believe when you understand the three innate mediums of two-way communication; your life and that of your horse or dog will be enhanced.
Of the three mediums of two-way communication; the human communication of sound; as in the spoken words of a sentence; is excessive of what a horse requires or is able to understand. For this reason, we use very few (Compared to the many at our command) human word sounds in training.
We may talk at or to them using sentences, but the horse only recognizes the key directive word(s). The tone of the other words in the sentence, merely enhance and support the message of the key word. Such as the soft drawn out “whoa, Easy it will be alright”, which we often accompany with touching; as when we are wanting to sooth and calm a horse.
I recognize some of the Sounds in the horses’ communication and I have a good idea of the message or intent of the sounds, but I do not recognize the profound intimacy of all the horse’s sounds. There may be sounds with which the horse communicates, which my ears cannot pick up.
Training horses is all about Two-Way, Communication; it is an intentional act to modify a horse’s behavior. Communication conveys information. Clear intentional communication is the essence of any enduring relationship. Communication when Understood leads to Predictability.
As humans we are able to develop sounds that mimic those of some animals. Animals, however (for the most part) cannot produce sound to mimic us. At the same time both humans and animals seem to learn quickly the superficial aspects of each other’s visual and touch mediums of two-way communication.
Horses throughout the world communicate using the same signals, it is universal. An Italian horse understands the communication from an English horse, even though neither has never before heard or seen the other. I do not think it is possible for a normal horse to misinterpret the communications of another normal horse.
In addition, to our benefit; horses are not able to lie, so we do not have to consider whether their communication is or is not true. On the other hand, we humans are not only able, but apt at lying, misleading or deceiving each other; using all three innate mediums of two-way communication.
In my work I hold fast to a clear fundamental belief and understanding of certain words and phrases in the world of US and EQUUS. I cannot and will not vary from these fundamentals.
They are in part; Training is an intentional endeavor to modify behavior; Learning is an intentional or unintentional process, Trust is status we extend to others when they prove trustworthy and Confidence is an ever changing state of mind an animal or human holds of themselves.
On the subject of unintentional and intentional learning, consider; I fall off a bridge into the water and don’t know how to swim; I would probably frantically begin flailing my arms and legs about, trying to stay afloat. If I did stay afloat and made it to shore I would have unintentionally learned to swim, to a small degree. An example of intentional learning is: I now take swimming lessons, I am intentionally learning to swim, and the instructor is teaching me.
As a trainer; in order to develop a mutually respectfully relationship with a positive, residual affect; the animal and I must experience each other face to face. As a trainer, I communicate to the horse, my true intention; that being, I mean him no harm. The horse, by accepting or rejecting what I do with him; teaches me my communication is working… or not working. It sometimes is a process of trial and error, but it works well.
The moment we both realize each other’s intent, we are standing at the thresh hold of mutual trust. As our training sessions continue, and our communication is refined, mutual trust increases. Our sessions of Ground training, enhance my future efforts of training the horse for riding or driving.
My nomadic life style, has allowed me to experience and learn from many people, horses and dogs. My experiences led me to create an aphorism, titled: A CUP of Blended T’s; the letters C. U. P. are an acronym for Communication, Understanding, and Predictability. The Blended T’s, segment is stated below.
I find keeping this in the forefront of my thinking, fuels my search for new or more subtle communication of animals, as well as people.
C.U.P. Defined
The letter C = Communication through Visual, Sound & Touch, which are also three of the horses’ five senses.
The three mediums of two-way communication listed below are not prioritized.
The first medium of communication is visual. I call it visual because one must have and use their eyes to understand the communication being conveyed to them through the body movement of the origin in whole or in part. I
In the Deaf community this medium of communication is called Signing; and is well refined in that community.
Horses’ when communicating visually use their eyes, ears, bearing of their teeth, rapid opening and closing of the mouth, lip licking, movement of the head, feet, tail, and the overall demeanor of their body. The signal(s) of the aforementioned faculties may be presented individually or in correlation.
One easily understands visual communication when one sees a strange dog wonder into the pasture of a horse; if the horse is territorial; the horse, not knowing or liking the strange dog in its pasture, will bear its teeth, lower its head and make an attempt to bite kick or strike the dog.
Mules, unless trained otherwise, are known to be aggressive about dogs, strange or otherwise; for this reasons Burros (One of US in Equus) are often a protective member of a Sheep herd.
The dog understands what the horse is communicating; which is, get out! The communication can be deadly serious or one of a threatening aspect. The horse’s action is an intentional visual communication.
When a pack of carnivorous animals on the hunt see a prey animal limping, Unable to keep up with the herd, that is an example of an unintentional visual communication from the prey animal, conveying the message; I am hurt. The predator(s) knows from past experiences, this prey animal will be an easier catch than would be one not limping. And the chase is on.
The Police officer, directing traffic; conveys directives to the motorist and pedestrian using Visual communicates via his arms and hands.
I may use my entire body or my extremities, individually or in correlation; to communicate. With the aforementioned; I am able to create and develop signals which I present consistently and persistently, while at the same time; I incite the horse to perform a certain action or movement corresponding with that signal.
The second medium of communication is Sound. Horses create various sounds via their breath flowing from the lungs, through the nose and mouth. The sound might be a slight “mmmmm” as horses do when, I am ever so slightly late in feeding them, or like that of a mare nickering a message to her foal to stay close or the scream of a mare that lost track of her foal, or the screams of warning…from a stallion telling another stallion to stay away, or to give alarm to his herd as to the presence of danger.
The squeal or whine of a wounded prey animal is an example of an unintentional sound communication. A predator recognizes this sound and moves toward the sounds of the wounded animal.
During riding or driving I use sounds (such as the word Whoa) to direct my horse to stop or encourage them to stand still when In-hand. My horse can just as easily be trained to stop’ or stand when they hear other sounds, such as a whistle; if I were to consistently associate that sound with the act of stopping or standing. The old teamsters trained their work horses/mules to turn left to the sound of Haw’ and turn right to the sound of Gee’.
The third medium of communication is touch: An example of touch communication between horses would be when a foal rubs against his mother for comfort or bumps her in the flank to demand she let him nurse, still another touch communication is when the stallion nips, nuzzle or rubs against a mare during the mating ritual to determine her receptiveness. Still another would be when two horses walk up to each other and both, using their teeth scratch the other on certain areas of their body.
Another example of Touch is; if when a blind person is holding the harness handle of a guide dog walking forward. Suddenly the dog stops and refuses to walk forward upon command. The stopping and refusal to walk on upon command is noted in the non movement of the dogs harness handle, as the handle does not move unless the dog moves. This non movement communicates to the person holding the handle; there are dangerous or undesirable conditions ahead, in which case the person will heed the dog’s communication and stand still or direct the dog to go another way.
Brail’ is another example of touch communication; where in the reader must use their sense of touch with their finger tips moving along upon an array of raised dots on a Brail board. The arrangement of the dots, convey the message.
Another example of touch communication is a man and woman holding each other while dancing.
Still another example of touch communication is; when in the presences of a domestic cat, it rubs against me, this is an intentional touch communication from the cat; perhaps showing affection or marking me.
When I pet, rub and scratch my horses, I am communicating peace, and friendliness and pleasure, which brings comfort to them and me. When riding or driving and I apply pressure and release of my personal aids in an effort to direct a horse’s movement, I am using touch communication.
U = Understanding: When I recognize, and understand the signals horses uses to communicate; I know the generality of message they convey.
P = Predictability: Which means I am able to forecast the outcome of various circumstances and consequences.
Blended T’s = Training & Trust: The sequence is definitely training first, and if done humanely, kindly, consistently, the horse will extend to me a degree of trust.
Trust between me and an animal is simply: willing participation in degrees without fear. The more I train; the greater degree of trust the horse extends to me.
I must mention the absence of fear, does not necessarily reflect the presence of trust. The Lion in the wild having never seen me certainly does not fear me; he may move away from me until he discovers what I am about, who knows what he will do then. I guess it would depend on if he was hungry or wanted to use me as a chewy to play Tug of War with his partner?
One should remember; both fear and trust are learned and earned.
Training can be accomplished two ways. One way is face to face, where we train the animal through ground work, and he learns to trust us. We then continue training him to ride, drive or perform at liberty. This training begins at the first encounter when both parties are present and aware of each other. I feel; with a psychologically sound horse; humane, good training will produce trust.
The other way to train a horse has limits; it is through Pavlov’s involuntary response to a stimulus. Take an example of a wild horse held captive in a pen. Where in, without the horse being aware of my presence or participation; I will train him to open a gate or load into a trailer or something of that nature.
In either case he will develop trust for the environment, but he will not develop trust for me; I wasn’t in his presences, so how could he.
In closing, may I suggest; while incorporating a “Cup of Blended T’s” will not make one a trainer, it certainly is a fundamental aspect of good training. I myself enjoy a “Cup of Blended T’S” every day.
Footnote: Oder
Communication conveys information; therefore Taste and Odor are mediums of two-way communication. However these two senses only incoming information about the matter is communicated to the horse. When a horse Taste or smells something, the horse cannot convey information to another being via its taste and smell. Any information conveyed to must be visual, sound or touch and will be unintentional, although, it may be beneficial to the observer.
On the other hand with humans’ odor can be Unintentional or intentional; as is the case with use of perfume, after shave or the absences of. At the same time, one can, after tasting something, convey one’s feeling about the taste of it. However that communication must be via visual, sound or touch.
Having said this, I question the conduct of a dog rolling in a dead, smelly animal, manure or other debris and I ask, is his rolling in that stuff, an intentional act or a biological, involuntary function to hide their own odor.
Whatever it is; a horses’ ability to smell or their odor is a non-cognitive, biological, involuntary function. It communicates status or presences, it is unintentional communication.
On the other hand with humans’ odor can be Unintentional or intentional; as is the case with use of perfume or after shave or the absences of. At the same time, one can, after tasting something, convey one’s feeling about the taste of it. However that communication must be via visual, sound or touch.
Having said this, I question the conduct of a dog rolling in a dead, smelly animal, manure or other debris and I ask, is his rolling in that stuff, an intentional act or a biological, involuntary function to hide their own odor.
Whatever it is; a horses’ ability to smell or their odor is a non-cognitive, biological, involuntary function. It communicates status or presences, it is unintentional communication.

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Abby Collier May 15, 2011 - 5:04 pm

All dogs can snap,i believe it is how they are raised.Think about this if you were slapped,beaten,yelled at,etc would you not attack back.If i were them i would spend time with the animal before i put them on this freakin list.

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madeline May 24, 2011 - 4:50 pm

You are such an idi*** all of the dogs listed above are wonderful strong loyal breeds that just want love. They become harmful to people when someone does not train it properly, abuse, and neglect them.

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jack May 25, 2011 - 11:32 am

Hello Madeline
You are in correct about “all the dogs listed above” just wanting love.
There are individual dogs within almost every breed which do not accept our training and are dangerous to society. The bigger the dog the bigger the threat to society.
A good trainer(s)knows when a dog is not or will not modify their behavior via good training. If the dog is of such character and several trainers have worked with the dog; what should one do with such a dog which will not conform, respond, comply, or otherwise accept training??
Just as there are individual people who do not accept the rules of society. Those people (criminals) murder, rape, maim, cheat, lie, steal and abuse other people.
The above description of undesirable persons are the reason for prisons.

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Dannielle May 25, 2011 - 3:51 pm

Seriously? This list is stupid. I’ve had pretty much all of these dogs at one point or another. They are NOT aggressive. People confuse aggression with high prey drive. It’s really annoying. A Malamute or Husky has a VERY high prey drive, as do some lines of Shepherds. You must correct bad behavior, not treat them like your child, or abuse them. Fact is, if you’re a responsible dog owner, and you train your dog the RIGHT way, it doesn’t matter what the hell the breed is. It will be a damn good dog.

Even the most aggressive dogs can be retrained to the point of not biting/attacking. It’s very rare that they can’t. Saying a breed has ANY part in aggressive behavior is absolutely stupid. It all starts with the owner, the dog will not know better if never taught.

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jack May 26, 2011 - 1:46 pm

Hello Danielle
Everyone has opinions and some of us voice them, but then some do not. My opinion is; Your comment about “This list being stupid is correct. I would guess that it was designed that way to get people to comment, and it works.
I am curious about several things in your commentary. “I’ve had pretty much all of these dogs at one point or another” What happened to all the dogs you acquired.
You comment about “People confuse aggression with high prey drive” is correct. However, “High Prey Drive” will quickly turn into aggression,
If a dog of this character is in the hands of inexperienced, unknowledgeable, or irresponsible people.
You are also correct about “if you’re a responsible dog owner, and you train your dog the RIGHT way”. The problem is there is so much undesirable or ill training out there it is hard for the average dog owner to know who or what is the correct training for their dog and them as well. As far as treating dogs like children; If there is good parenting or dog training, the behavior of the child and dog will be enhanced.

The difference is the child will lie and deceive where the dog does not. In addition if good training is continued, the dog will continue to behave well, whereas, even if we continue good teaching/training of the best; the child will ultimately do what pleases them.

In the world of dogs there are bad ill tempered mean dog, just as there are people of the same character; no amount of good training of the dog or the finest education will make their innate character less.

In the case of humans; education and training will simply teach them how to be more successful in their ways.

Reiterating your comment of “Good training makes good dogs” the owners must continue with the good training or the dog will set his own perimeters.
Thanks for sharing.

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Utterance » Blog Archive » aggresive dogs pictures May 30, 2011 - 3:14 pm

[…] Most Dangerous Dogs in the World. Apr 1, 2009 … Photos source: http://www.flickr.com. ….. Some dogs are born aggressive, just as certain people are, … […]

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jack June 1, 2011 - 11:07 am

In reference to Sonia
Carl Manson was a cute baby ……as was Will Rogers.

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Thum June 2, 2011 - 3:14 pm

I owned ‘uche’ local breed in Uganda. This has been the toughest dog in history. Hunting and killing antelopes were easy gaming and could have registered numerous medals until we crossed over to Murchison national park for more challenging job. It took 2 African lions a great deal to overpower uche. Thank God I survived.

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domanique June 4, 2011 - 9:42 pm

these dogs are not aggressive its the way they are trained if u love your dog like a family member and spend time with it,,it would have a total different attitude

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Cindy June 4, 2011 - 10:32 pm

I have a rotti and he is the best most loving dog I have ever had! He’s not at all food aggressive and wold NEVER attack anyone, not even a stranger. He even plays with my three ferrets! He might love you to death, but that is about all he is capable of.

I am a 3rd year vet student, and I am wonder where you have gotten your information from. Some things such as how originally Great Danes were used for fighting an rotties for guarding is not true.

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CheckUrFacts June 5, 2011 - 2:45 am

Pit bulls were originally bred in England, Scotland and Ireland. The dog was bred first to bait bulls and bears. When baiting bulls was deemed inhumane, ratting and dog fighting became more popular. The APBT was used in both sports, and its prevalence in being put in pits with rats led to “pit” being added to its name. With time, the dogs became more commonly used as house pets due to their friendliness towards people. In America, farmers and ranchers used their APBTs for protection, as catch dogs for semi-wild cattle and hogs, to hunt, and to drive livestock.[6] The dog was used during World War I and World War II as a way of delivering messages on the battlefield.
Once an extremely popular family dog in the United States, the American Pit Bull Terrier’s popularity began to decline in the United States following World War II in favor of other breeds.

You should get your facts right!

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bhupinderr singh June 5, 2011 - 11:48 pm

i have a rottweiler which can even defeat pit bulls and bullies in dog fighting so he is the most powerful dog and he is my best friend

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Xavier June 6, 2011 - 10:05 pm

Dogo Argentino look them up. Friendly enough to craddle a new born powerful enough to toss a Kangal like a rag doll. @PRADEEP SINGH

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keith tagner June 7, 2011 - 6:28 am

As for the toughest or meanest. The bully kutta is the toughest dog in the world. I have the privilege of owning one. The reason I got one was because we live in the mountains and black bear make themselves known at least 15-20 times a year on my property. I spent 4 yrs researching the best dog to own for protection and kid friendly traits and this is the dog for that. I currently own a rhodesian and was extremely worried about these two getting along, and surprisingly the act like brothers. And now I can feel ABSOLUTELY POSITIVE that if I take my eyes of the kids while they are playing outside that all is well.

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Aubrey McMekin June 8, 2011 - 7:02 pm

They should but Golden Retrievers on year if they wanna put Great Danes. I own a Golden Retriever and a Lab/Rhodesian Ridge Back. Neither of them have ever bitten people but they are territorial so they do run up to people that walk through the yard barking up a storm which scares most people. The Golden Retriever was a rescue, the poor thing was tied to a tree with a chain that got struck by lightning. Gentle as he is with humans, if comes across another dog when he is sometimes loose in the yard he will try and attack. With a immense amount of training, on both the dogs part and my familes, he hasn’t attacked another dog in over a year!

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geraint morgan June 10, 2011 - 7:38 pm

why are huskys rated 4th i have had two one of them lived till 12 and he was the most loving dog u could ever have and i just bought one 4 weeks ago now it is 15 weeks and is cute has hell plus the other husky i had was nice with other dogs 2 and there is two different breed of huskys there is a siberian husky and a alaskan husky so be more specific

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emmanuel chinaedozi June 11, 2011 - 1:11 pm

i love the dogs in the especially the rottweiler, pit bull, bowalbull, germanshepherd,their very good to have…

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Dogman62 June 14, 2011 - 4:44 pm

Boxer dangerous? Absolute rubbish and as for being careful when play fighting you obvously never owned a boxer or a dog in general…

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ikechukwu Okoli June 16, 2011 - 8:36 pm

these dogs listed here are not dangerous if trained well by its owner.The owner is responsible for its actions,Dog are like children.
I am a Dog breeder and My left thumb has been bitten off by a German shepherd 4years ago but i still love dogs why because i blame the owner not dog.
So pls,let us encourage one another.
The article is educative

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ikechukwu Okoli June 16, 2011 - 8:41 pm

These dogs listed here are not dangerous if trained well by its owner.The owner is responsible for its actions,Dog are like children.
I am a Dog breeder and My left thumb has been bitten off by a German shepherd 4years ago but i still love dogs why because i blame the owner not the dog.
So pls,let us encourage one another.
The article is educative

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lexi&morgi:) July 12, 2011 - 1:47 am

i fully algree, and support you. i have a rottweiler and my bestfriend has two pitbulls. i have also been close with many of those other breeds listed, and it turns out they are the most dorky, goofy, and loving dogs out there. The only reason these breeds are on this list, is because some dumbass owners chain their dogs up outside and beat them and neglect them. there is no such thing as a bad dog, just a bad owner, and they are the ones who should take the blame. not the dogs themselves. Also, did anyone notice that all of the breeds on here are some of the biggest breeds out there? i think thats complete and utter bullshit. You hear more often about aggressive chiuahua’s than pitbulls and rotties and all of them. Those rat dogs should get banned more than those loving breeds listed above, simply because they are more aggressive than these dogs. if anydogs shuld get banned, it should be the small and annoying yappers, cause they are the ones who bite the most. Stop being ignorant, you asswholes! have a nice day.

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Catherine June 19, 2011 - 10:42 am

Um really though
My freind has a rottie
my other has a German shepard
my cousin has a st bernard
And im got a pit bull
And they are sweeties
all trained with cesar millan techniques

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murat June 20, 2011 - 12:42 pm Reply
GURSEWAK June 21, 2011 - 11:36 am

I AM THOUGHT PITBULL AND BULLY IS THE MOST DANGEROUS DOG.PITBULL IS SMALL DOG BREED ITS BITE FORCE IS LESS THAN ROTTWEILER BUT ITS INTREST IN FIGHT MAKE ITS MOST DANGEROUS AND FIGHTING DOG BULLY IS SEEN BY SOME PEOPLE BUT IT IS A FIGHTER DOG

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jack June 25, 2011 - 10:46 am

Cup of blended T’s
These writing were directed at the horse, but apply to dogs as well.

Before one may become a good trainer of horses or dogs, or any animal for that matter; they must understand that training is all about communication. In my relationship with animals, I discovered for myself the Three Innate Mediums of two-way communication common to all animals; which are Visual, Sound and Touch, which are in part, inter specie; perhaps not to the intimate level as is intra species, but the generality of a given message is clear.
The more signals within the mediums of communication one recognizes and understands; the more enhanced is their training ability. This is the profound, but simple reason why some people become good trainers and why good trainers become great trainers.
When in the presence of a horse; I endeavor to learn the signals with which he conveys information. He is the teacher;* granted, his teaching role with me may be unintentional, but that does not lessen my role as willing student. Upon learning his signals I can begin training* him to learn mine.
If you have “Horse in the Heart” you are one of”US in EQUUS” we are a family that learns through sharing. I believe when you understand the three innate mediums of two-way communication; your life and that of your horse or dog are enhanced.
Of the three innate mediums of two-way communication; the human communication of sound; as in the spoken words of a sentence; is excessive of what a horse requires or is able to understand. For this reason, we use very few (Compared to the many at our command) human word sounds in training.
We may talk at or to them using sentences, but the horse only recognizes the key directive word(s). The tone or attitude, such as harsh, friendly, or playful sound of the other words in the sentence, merely enhance and support the message of the key word. For instance, the soft drawn out key word of “whoa”, supported with the “Easy it will be alright”, which we often accompany with touching; as when we are wanting to sooth and calm a horse. One could also use intimidating tones and attitude when saying Whoa!
I recognize some of the Sounds horses make and I have a good idea of the message or intent of the sound. I do not recognize the profound intimacy of all the horse’s sounds. In addition, there may be sounds with which the horse communicates, which I have not heard for whatever reason?
Communication conveys information. Clear intentional communication is the essence of any enduring relationship. Communication when Understood leads to Predictability.
As humans we are able to develop sounds that mimic those of some animals. Animals, however (for the most part) cannot produce sound to mimic us. At the same time both humans and animals seem to learn quickly the superficial aspects of each other’s visual and touch mediums of two-way communication.
Horses, throughout the world, or dogs for that matter; communicate using the same signals, it is universal. An Italian horse understands the communication from an English horse, even though neither has never before heard or seen the other. To appreciate the horses’ simplicity of communication via sound, one would merely note the complex and perplexing sounds in the multi language and dialects in which humans communicate.
An interesting note; horses are not able to lie, so we do not have to wait for that which they communicate to prove true, if they communicated it that is what they mean and their intent.
On the other hand, we humans are not only able, but apt at lying, misleading or deceiving each other; using all three innate mediums of two-way communication.
In my practicing of training horses, I have accepted definitions of certain words which I hold fast to. I feel they are fundamental and aid me in maintaining and understanding the horse. However I am open to learning new ways of enhancing my life and that of the horse.
These words in part are; Training, an intentional endeavor to modify behavior; Good training enhances our relationship with the horse, while bad training destroys it. It is not uncommon for a well trained horse to end up in the hands of a bad trainer/rider.
Learning can be an intentional or unintentional process.
Trust, a status we extend to others when they prove trustworthy.
Confidence, an ever changing state of mind an animal or human holds of themselves.
A good example of unintentional and intentional learning is; I fall off a bridge into the water and don’t know how to swim; I would probably frantically begin flailing my arms and legs about, trying to stay afloat. If I did stay afloat and made it to shore I would have unintentionally learned to swim, to a small degree. An example of intentional learning is: I now take swimming lessons, I am intentionally learning to swim, and the instructor is teaching me.
As a trainer; in order to develop mutually respect in the relationship and a positive, residual affect; the animal and I must experience each other face to face. As a trainer, I communicate to the horse, my true intention; that being, I mean him no harm. The horse, by accepting or rejecting what I do with him; shows me my communication is working… or not working. Training is sometimes a process of trial and error.
The moment the Horse and I realize; neither of us intends harm, we are both standing at the thresh hold of mutual trust. As our training sessions continue, and our communication is learned and refined we both hold the status of mutual trust; and our continued sessions of Ground Training, enhance my future efforts of training the horse for riding or driving.
My nomadic life style, has allowed me to experience and learn from many people, horses and dogs. My experiences led me to create an aphorism, titled: A CUP of Blended T’s; the letters C. U. P. are an acronym for Communication, Understanding, and Predictability. The Blended T’s, segment is stated below.
I find keeping this in the forefront of my thinking, fuels my search for new or more subtle communication of animals, as well as people.
C.U.P. Defined
The letter C = Communication through Visual, Sound & Touch, which are also three of the horses’ five senses.
The three innate mediums of two-way communication listed below are not prioritized.
The first medium of communication is visual. I call it visual because one must have and use their eyes to understand the physical signals conveyed via the horse’s extremities; individually or in correlation.
In the Deaf community this visual medium of communication is called Signing; and is well refined in that community.
Horses’ communicating visually use their eyes, ears, bearing of their teeth, rapid opening and closing of the mouth, lip licking, movement of the head, feet, tail, and the overall demeanor of their body.
One easily understands visual communication when one sees a strange dog wonder into the pasture of a horse; if the horse is territorial; the horse, not knowing or liking the strange dog in its pasture, will bear its teeth, lower its head and make an attempt to bite, kick or strike the dog.
Mules, unless trained otherwise, are known to be aggressive about dogs, strange or otherwise; for this reasons Burros (One of US in Equus) are often a protective member of a Sheep herd.
The dog understands what the horse is communicating; which is, get out! The communication can be a threatening aspect or one of a deadly serious nature. The horse’s action is an intentional visual communication.
When a pack of carnivorous animals on the hunt see a prey animal limping, unable to keep up with the herd, that is another example of an unintentional visual communication from the prey animal, conveying the message; I am hurt. The predator(s) knows from past experiences, this prey animal will be an easier catch than would be one not limping. And the chase is on.
The Police officer, directing traffic; conveys directives to the motorist and pedestrian using Visual communicates via his arms and hands.
I may use my entire body or my extremities, individually or in correlation; to communicate my directives to a horse. With the aforementioned; I am able to create and develop signals which I present consistently and persistently, while at the same time; I incite the horse to perform a certain action or movement corresponding with that signal.
The second medium of communication is Sound. Horses create various sounds via their breath flowing from the lungs, through the nose and mouth. The sound might be a slight “mmmmm” as horses do when, I am ever so slightly late in feeding them, or like that of a mare nickering a message to her foal to stay close or the scream of a mare that lost track of her foal, or the screams of warning…from a stallion telling another stallion to stay away, or to give alarm to his herd as to the presence of danger.
The squeal or whine of a wounded prey animal is an example of an unintentional sound communication. A predator recognizes this sound and moves toward the sounds of the wounded animal.
During riding or driving I use sounds (such as the word Whoa) to direct my horse to stop or encourage them to stand still when In-hand. My horse can just as easily be trained to stop’ or stand when they hear other sounds, such as a whistle; if I were to consistently associate that sound with the act of stopping or standing. The old teamsters trained their work horses/mules to turn left to the sound of Haw’ and turn right to the sound of Gee’.
The third medium of communication is touch: An example of touch communication between horses would be when a foal rubs against his mother for comfort or bumps her in the flank to demand she let him nurse, still another touch communication; is when the stallion nips, nuzzle or rubs against a mare during the mating ritual to determine her receptiveness. Still another would be when two horses walk up to each other and both, using their teeth scratch the other on certain areas of their body.
Another example of Touch is; when a blind person is holding the harness handle of a guide dog walking forward. Suddenly the dog stops and refuses to walk forward upon command. The stopping and refusal to walk on upon command is noted in the non movement of the dogs harness handle, as the handle does not move unless the dog moves. This non movement communicates to the person holding the handle; there are dangerous or undesirable conditions ahead, in which case the person will heed the dog’s communication and stand still or direct the dog to go another way.
Brail’ is another example of touch communication; where in the reader must use their sense of touch with their finger tips moving along upon an array of raised dots on a Brail board. The arrangement of the dots, convey the message.
Another example of touch communication is a man and woman holding each other while dancing.
Still another example of touch communication is; when in the presences of a domestic cat, it rubs against me, this is an intentional touch communication from the cat; perhaps showing affection or marking me.
When I pet, rub or scratch my horses, I am communicating peace, and friendliness and pleasure, which brings comfort to them and me. When riding or driving and I apply pressure and release of my personal aids in an effort to direct a horse’s movement, I am using touch communication.
Once I begin riding the horse, I incite the horse through (touch) my personal aids of legs, seat, and hands individually or in correlation. I apply pressure and release of these aids in a timely manner associated with a movement or action I want him to perform.
U = Understanding: When I recognize, and understand the signals horses uses to communicate; I know the generality of message they convey.
P = Predictability: Which means I am able to forecast the outcome of various circumstances and consequences.
Blended T’s = Training & Trust: The sequence is definitely training first, and if done humanely, kindly, consistently, the horse will extend to me a degree of trust.
Trust between me and an animal is simply: willing participation in degrees without fear. The more I train; the greater degree of trust the horse extends to me.
I must mention the absence of fear, does not necessarily reflect the presence of trust. The Lion in the wild having never seen me certainly does not fear me; he may move away from me until he discovers what I am about, who knows what he will do then. I guess it would depend on if he was hungry or wanted to use me as a chewy to play Tug of War with his partner?
One should remember; both fear and trust are learned and earned.
Training can be accomplished two ways. One way is face to face, where we train the animal through ground work, and he learns to trust us. We then continue training him to ride, drive or perform at liberty. This training begins at the first encounter when both parties are present and aware of each other. I feel; with a psychologically sound horse; humane, good training will produce trust.
The other way to train a horse has limits; it is through Pavlov’s involuntary response to a stimulus. Take an example of a wild horse held captive in a pen. Where in, without the horse being aware of my presence or participation; I will train him to open a gate or load into a trailer or something of that nature.
In either case he will develop trust for the environment, but he will not develop trust for me; I wasn’t in his presences, so how could he.
In closing, may I suggest; while incorporating a “Cup of Blended T’s” will not make one a trainer, it certainly is a fundamental aspect of good training. I myself enjoy a “Cup of Blended T’S” every day.
Footnote: Oder
Communication conveys information; therefore Taste and Odor are mediums of One-way Communication. However these two senses convey only incoming information about the matter they smell or taste. When a horse taste or smells something, the horse cannot convey information to another being via its senses of taste and smell. Any information conveyed must be conveyed via visual, sound or touch and will be unintentional.
On the other hand with humans’ odor can be unintentional or intentional; as is the case with use of perfume, after shave or the absences of same. However one can taste something or smell it and convey one’s feeling about the taste of it, but that communication must be via visual, sound or touch.
Having said this, I question the conduct of a dog rolling in a dead, smelly animal, manure or other debris and I ask, is his rolling in that stuff, an intentional act or a biological, involuntary function to hide their own odor.
Whatever it is; a horses’ ability to smell or their odor is a non-cognitive, biological, involuntary function. It communicates status or presences, it is unintentional communication.
The definition of certain words in the English language is often multi in meaning, yet different in application. Therefore I define the words to express my application of them. Yours may be different and so be it.
*Teaching: the endeavor to convey information to another, where in they may use this information at their discretion.
*Training: The endeavor to modify the behavior of another. In the case of animals, we train them to perform an action or movement upon cue from the trainer.

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Sunny July 1, 2011 - 10:50 am

hi;In Bd there is a furious breed of hound.Domestic name of the dog is”Sarial”.The breed is furious enough to take a place in top ten list.

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Franklin July 2, 2011 - 2:15 pm

I have a mix breed rott and a russian alsatian, the thing is that the rott is always submissive to the alsatian because the alsatian is a year older. why?

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Sarah July 2, 2011 - 10:00 pm

OK REALLY!!!! THIS IS A TOTAL LIE. MALIMUTES AND THE HUSKY ARE THE SWEETEST, SWEETEST DOGS THAT YOU CAN HAVE MY TWO HUSKIES HAVE NEVER EVER EVER EVEN PUT THEIR TEETH ON ANY ONE BUT US WHEN THEY WHERE AT THE NIPPING STATE OF THEIR LIFE. I DONT KNOW WHY THEU ARNT THE NUMBER ONE ON THE SWEETEST DOGS EVERY. WHO EVER MADE THIS THIS IS A TOTAL JOKE, AND A LIE. A BIG BIG LIE!!!!

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walli khan July 4, 2011 - 10:30 am

hey all i want 2 say just that rotwailer is the only dog which is 1 man dog because it is very dangerous and other are not dangerous they should been trained by a good trainer so that they can be change and not be dangerous but i think that rotwailer is the most dangerous agressive and nice god in the whole world

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paras bhardwaj July 5, 2011 - 10:16 am

i have a 2 year pug and 1 year st.bernard dog she is very sweet and dengerous but she is a stud dog and i proud my dogs

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Courtney July 6, 2011 - 12:16 am

wtf pitbulls and german shepherds my pit plays with the neighbors german shepherd with no problems and both dogs are just as sweet as can be i have only seen 2 pits in my life to be aggressive and not to people just other dogs and never seen 1 mean german shepherd

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alana July 10, 2011 - 6:51 pm

First up who ever said pits good choice….people who say oh these dogs were made for fighting well ya OK and German shepherds were made for something else each dog was made for a certain purpose and if not made then trained into being who they are. many people say that pits are bad animals and not as good because of story’s well like every other animal the pit defends itself just like any other dog that was mentioned above would do too….i hate wen people give me a look wen i tell them i have 2 pits…just because its not a German or any great Dane or dalmatian doesn’t mean anything now im not saying these animals are the best in the world but dont put them down because your blind and cant see the joy that these animals bring to their owners and owners children.

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JGo555 July 11, 2011 - 10:00 am

I have found that you have several mistakes regarding height & weight of the dogs described. You have also left out quite A LOT of information of what some of the mentioned dogs were bred for & some of it was wrong.

One of the biggest things you’ve forgotten to add to the article in general is that:

“all dogs are capable of mauling someone to death. The reason why these dogs are mentioned here is because they are large dogs that can maul in a short time while cause great damage.

A Yorkie can kill a person, it’ll just take quite some time for this person to die from the bites being that it will take him a while to bring you down. Unlike a big dog that with a few bites to the neck (which it can jump & reach quite easily) can kill you in 2 minutes if it severs an artery.”

All of these inaccuracies in your article I attribute to the fact that you are a cat person & can not really be bothered to look for factual information about the dogs. When animals & people are young of course they look cute! Why wouldn’t you like puppies!? I an a dog person & I like kittens…

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Ian July 14, 2011 - 9:50 pm

Pitbulls are not bad dogs at all. Poodles and cocker spaniels bite just as often with no publicity. It’s a shame that Bullies are labeled as anything other than loyal to their owners. Most people that have pits who attack people are the same people who have kids that attack people. Ban the people not the dog.

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Sara July 16, 2011 - 12:07 pm

What the hell does a cat person know about dogs? Thats bs that you go into detail about all the dogs and then one sentence about the pit bulls. Pit bulls are not mostly used for fighting, they are loving pets to families with children. The top ten dogs that attack humans, the pit bull isn’t even on that list stupid.

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zozopaw July 21, 2011 - 11:30 pm

Well wheres the bull terrier they are very dangerous dogs.

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Tala Zane July 26, 2011 - 12:12 am

Pit bulls are only going to be mean if you raise them that way. Answer me this, do you think pit is born mean and vicous? Its just a simple “yes” “no” answer. If you raise a Golden or a lab like that, then, you bet, that dog is going to be mean. i’ve seen hundreds of of pits wagging their tails a mile a minute and very happy to see me or someone else. I have 2 boxers and they are the most freindliest dogs you could ever want. They are very sweet wich makes me very, curious as to why they would b on this list.

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ALVARO October 25, 2012 - 6:52 pm

Ei people… no offense.. but all of u guys are so funny… listen… before making any comments to this article must first know whats the real theme of it… sorry to the writer ( Anastasia ), but u forgot to say what u really meant about writing ur article ’bout “The Most Dangerous Dogs in the World”.

First: how do u really define the word “DANGEROUS” from ur article? is it dangerous in terms of harming people?? and whos people.. strangers? neighbors? friends? children? ur own children (if u have one)? its owner? you??? or maybe not humans.. maybe animals?? farm animals? domesticated (house pet)? Dogs itself? from one breed to another? what?..

Second: why did u say “MOST” dangerous? coz of the number of crimes from its breed?? which country? what happened? what were the cases? were u even there and personally saw it and witnessed it? or maybe from your own experiences? or maybe u just heard it, maybe from the news? or from some people, like.. friends? or maybe u did read some articles bout it?? “SOME” means not all of it! ( and im pretty sure bout it… ;))

Last: “in the WORLD”… why? how come? did u go and visited each and every country and did any statistics and made some real surveys?..

And to others: (Braveness, Strongness, Aggressiveness are different from each other, each of these words has it own meaning..)

NOTE: A lack of understanding of natural dog behavior is a huge part of the dog overpopulation problem. If people had stable dogs in their homes it would be rare they would ever give them up, and when they did have to it would be much easier to find a home for a behaved dog. It is the dogs with “issues” that our pounds and shelters are full of. Most homeless dogs are not the stable dogs that have had their instincts met. The good part is it is never too late for a dog; they can change if the humans around them change. It is the humans that need the training.

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Jerrica July 26, 2011 - 12:38 pm

Some of the information on this is inaccurate. The pit bull was NOT bred to be a fighting dog. It was bred to be a guardian, but not a fighter per say. The fighting dogs we see are dogs that have been inbred, raised to be aggressive, or bred specifically from those dogs that were born with a naturally aggressive temperament. These dogs are not all aggressive, just as not all German Shepherds are aggressive. These dogs look intimidating, but I’ve known more bites from chihuahuas and terriers than any of the breeds listed on this site. Of course those breeds won’t show up on a list because they’re so small, but I would expect a bit from a smaller dog before I’d expect a bite from any of the breeds listed here. I actually know a pit bull that acts as a nanny to her owner’s child. She’s more gentle a dog than my own golden retriever mix. Many of these breeds simply have more publicity when they attack due to their “mean” look or lack of understanding of their temperament on the part of their handler.

Most of the problem is not the dog, but rather the handler. If a dog is raised and socialized properly with the human acting as the alpha, there will be a lower chance of the dog becoming aggressive towards humans. All too often, the problem is born of the fact that the human knows nothing of the temperament and just wants an intimidating looking dog. It is a recipe for disaster. I’m not saying that there is no chance of a dog turning on its handler. I’ve known dogs that did that, but in my experience, 98% of the dogs that were raised and socialized properly remained faithful and loyal companions.

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[…] Canine reproduction – Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaCanine Reproduction Information (Breeds, Female, Days … Canine reproduction – Dog Information, Videos and Pictures …DogHow to Determine What’s Special About a “Specialized” Dog Food …Dog Breeding and Canine Reproduction by Debbie Jensen. Dog …Adams Dog Training and Dog BehaviorCanine reproduction – WikivisualMost Dangerous Dogs in the World.Dog […]

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Courtney July 27, 2011 - 4:20 am

I don’t agree with most of your dog choices. Any dog can be perfectly safe and sweet if trained right. But the most vicious dogs I’ve ever seen have all been little dogs, they bite and tear skin open and their owners, for the most part, always just think “Its so cute” and “They think they are so ferocious” and are unwilling to properly discipline their dogs. I have nothing against little dogs, as my roommate and I have a Min Pin, but we are NOT afraid to squirt him with some water, to pin him down (to make him submit, AKA: in dog terms telling him we are the bosses), or to raise our voices if he does something wrong. But I have never seen ANY little dog EVER make a list like this. However ANY breeder, specific breed expert, veterinarian, and even the ASPCA STRONGLY discourage families with small children from getting small dogs because they tend to bite. They also warn people when adopting that they might bite. This just makes me question people’s biases against larger dogs as opposed to smaller ones. That said; ANY dog NOT trained right (as in well, AKA: to be well behaved, not referring to any specific dog training method) can be dangerous so these lists should really be lists of people who don’t train their dogs right, not specific breeds that bite more often than others.

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Phill August 6, 2011 - 5:01 pm

What about the Caucasian ovcharka?

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Melantha November 5, 2011 - 7:43 pm

Caucasian Ovcharkas were bred to guard and protect their property, their masters and livestock. Caucasian Ovcharkas will guard the entire family from the adult humans all the way down to the pet Iguana. Anything in the same pack with an Ovcharka will be considered part of the pack by these dogs and thus fall under their guardianship. Ovcharkas will try to dominate or ward of unfamiliar dogs but calm but firm and humane handling will mold the dog into a sound minded pet. They will still be suspicious of strange dogs and people and should not be left alone with small children due to their size.

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dylan August 10, 2011 - 7:07 pm

okay, first off some of these dogs on the list really arent supposed to be here. or maybe i just didnt read the title correctly, but i doubt it. what i do know is that anybody who thinks that the pit bull is the best fighting dog or the most vicious dog clearly hasnt educated themselves on this subject, and dog fighting is still legal in some other countries. now as far as the pit bull is concerned it is not the best fighting dog. it would not stand a chance against a cane corso or a tosa inu, namely for the fact that if you went around the world to where dog fighting was legal and asked the people who participated in those matches what they thought of the pit bull theyd probably tell you the pit bull would be pretty far down on their list for best fighting dogs, tosa inu or pakistani mastiff most likely being higher, the pit bull is just seen as the best cause its what the illegal dog fighters in the U.S. like to use. and i dont think i need to tell you that illegal dog fighters in our country are probably not very well educated. as for the list i didnt have too many problems just the huskys and the saint bernard. i really dont think they belong…

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mean lion August 21, 2011 - 11:40 am

pits at the bottom of the list i knew they not that dangerous

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Igbozuruike August 21, 2011 - 8:12 pm

I think pitbulls is the most aggresive dog i ever seen, but they are good for security purposes

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Devis September 4, 2011 - 8:49 am

What about CANE CORSO

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pissedoff October 17, 2011 - 2:03 pm

a cane corso is merely an enlarged version of a pitbull….therefore a bigger baby

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Anna September 5, 2011 - 4:17 am

How in the hell do you make a husky aggressive? We have had huskies for 30 years and they have never been aggressive towards other dogs or people. Opposite, they have always walked away if a fellow dog has been aggressive. We have never “trained” our dogs, using common sense and studying dog psychology is enough. Huskies are not clowns who want to please people by making tricks! They are intelligent, kind and wolflike creatures, who need a lot of excercise. And they enjoy doing digging and chasing mice and other creatures…
Anna from Finland
p.s. dogs learn a lot of words and tones a speech. Being kind and loving is better way than being too strict dog trainer.

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kami October 6, 2011 - 2:22 pm

My huskies are amazing, I know everyones pets are different ours are oactually big babies very emotional dog you raise your voice and they automatically get their feelings hurt… never aggressive you can’t even play to rough without them pouting.. I have a two year old and a 5 month old and dangerous makes me laugh..

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Quinn September 6, 2011 - 4:01 am

I am pretty confused from all this some things i don’t understand like how is a chow chow there they are tiny and in the least way look aggresive they only look cute and fluffy.I agree with lots of people here how they say little dogs are more aggresive because i have an australian terrier half silky and she is very protective. She has bitten my childrens friends when they run around after them. She has also bit my neighbour we also can’t let her near other dogs. But within the family and friends she is soooooo loving and caring she has never bit any of us. We also have a cat, which we found as a kitten and my dog raised her she protecetd her as well by following her everywhere and on some occasions liking her clean plus they have never fought. I love all dogs and by the way thise people that run dog fights and watch them should be made to rot in jail

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Smudge September 15, 2011 - 8:33 am

Every dog has the potential to be dangerous given the right circumstances. I work at a vet clinic and see numeral dogs daily. Some of them are seemingly calm and placid while others are outright aggressive. I have seen calm German Shepherds and crazy Scottish Terriers. I own two purebred English Bull Terriers and they are completely safe. Much to my amusement, however, I have had people pick up their little toy dogs when i walk past with my bullies. My calmest dog, however, has tried to attack someone when they were trespassing in my backyard late at night. He was unscathed, but the barking woke me up and i called the cops. Underestimating a dog is one of the worst things someone can do when facing up against an aggressive dog.

A dog is born with aggression. Of course, some Pit Bulls are trained to fight other dogs, but we are talking about family dogs. Of course, some dogs that are away from their owners act differently than expected. A Husky has tried to bite me after the owner assured me he was completely harmless. Perhaps, however, i was at fault; i was trying to give him a vaccination. I know of dogs that are put down because of their behaviour problems. Yes, some can be changed, but others are stuck like that. A traumatic experience in their life can change a dog forever. I was given a Bull Terrier that had been rescued from an abusive home. He had been tied to a clothesline with a hose and was beaten by a man. He would never get over this fear of men, hoses and clotheslines.

A lot of the arguing that i have read (I haven’t read all of it) is about Pit Bulls. I live in Australia and its fair to say that i have never seen a Pit Bull. However, a Pit Bull is like any other breed of dog. Let us relate a Pit Bull to a Golden Retriever. They both have teeth, they both can bite, they both have tails. As i have said before, some dogs are born aggressive. Not all. A lot of dogs aren’t, however, there are a few that are. An aggressive born Pit Bull is the same as an aggressive born Golden Retriever.

I have also read that a lot of people are saying:
“Well, Huskies/German Shepherds/Dobermans/ Pit Bulls/ etc. can’t be dangerous, because i own a Husky/German Shepherd/Doberman/Pitbull and i know that my dog represents every dog that was every born from that breed, ever!”
Okay, you have a lovely, well behaved, beautiful dog. Congratulations. You, however, have only seen a small percentage of the millions of dogs from that breed. From the millions of dogs from one breed, you have to expect some of them to be aggressive, some will develop cancer, some will die when they are young, some will die when they are old. Saying you’re dog represents every dog that has ever been born is like owning a black German Shepherd and saying that “Every German Shepherd is black.” It just isn’t true.

After this rant i have just realised that i forgot what i was typing about (blame my short attention span). Hopefully i haven’t just said everything someone else has said (though knowing me i have). Feel free to get angry at me for saying that sometimes aggression isn’t caused just by training.

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mandaa September 20, 2011 - 11:24 am

im sorry ur info about pit bulls is wrong they was breed for bull bating not fighting.

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Stella G Vidales October 2, 2011 - 8:49 pm

Thank you for standing up for Pit Bulls! Whatever they were bred for was back in history. Many Pit Bulls are owned by famous people like Racheal Ray & Jaimie Fox. We have GOT to get rid of this very undeserved rap that these poor animals have. Pit Bulls were used as Nannies in the early 20th century. I LOVE PIT BULLS!!

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S September 20, 2011 - 2:47 pm

Lists like this are not meant to be a slam against an individual dog breed, but rather a look at statistics that show how many attacks there were and what type of dogs were responsible, the reason some potentially more aggressive did not make this list is because there are not as many of them around. Some make the list because they are so popular and with higher numbers comes higher numbers of attacks. Most of the dogs of these breeds will go through there lives never harming a fly but the ones that do attack do a lot of damage, my 3 previous dalmatians never hurt anyone and the one I have now probably never will either but somewhere in the world there have been dalmatians that have attacked and therefore my beloved breed landed on this list and many others. I work in a vet clinic and I have seen some of these breeds come in and they are the best patients I could ask for but others are not and having been bitten on several occasions i must say that small dogs are much MORE AGGRESSIVE but they are LESS DANGEROUS because they don’t have the power to back up the bite. Of the times i have been bitten the only ones on this list was a Rottie that was scared out of her mind and a pit-bull mix that was in pain after being attacked by a Great Dane. The others were all small “babies” that never left there owners laps except to pee. 2 American Eskimos, 3 separate cocker spaniels, a chihuahua, a pom and a yorkie that screamed bloody murder and tried to kill you if you went within a foot of its kennel. Of the times I got bit Even though the small dogs were aggressive while the large dogs were actually scared/hurt the only times I needed to go to emergency room was with the rottie and the pitt. Not because they ment to hurt me like the small ones but because they had power behind it. There is a big difference between dangerous and aggressive.

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jack October 2, 2011 - 10:46 pm

The Pit Bull is an animal and like other Big Dogs of like capacity they are subject to good training. There are approximately 77 million dogs in the U.S.A. Every one of these animals; are capable of thinking, perceiving, interpreting and reacting without our input or direction. Although we can and do train our animals to respond only to our personal directive, It is the untrained and disobedient dogs and irresponsible owners that cause the problems.
A dog is like a small child; and we must constantly be aware of what they are doing and thinking if we are to keep them from harm’s way. Both will learn with or without our input so there must be a knowledgeable strong leader to protect and train them. Without that leadership; respect and obedience will not happen. Respect is not an innate attribute of a dog or a child, it must be learned and earned. A dog or child who does not respect authority/humans becomes empowered and becomes the leader in that relationship.
Aggression in any breed is a concern. With Pit Bulls, and other like dogs of like capacity the consequences of an attack is paramount. I do not trust any person or animal as individuals, until they have proven trustworthy. I give both the same respect I would give a person with a gun in their hand, that being I do not place myself in a position where that persons carelessness will cause me harm.
Safety in handling dogs can only come from recognizing, understanding, learning, and using the mediums of communication the dog uses, which are Visual, that being physical movement of their extremities individually or in correlation, therefore we must be in a position to see the communications, such as the dog’s tail and/or ear movement, their body frame. Sound, that being the levels of barking, growls, whines, moans, therefore we must be in a position to hear the communication, and Tactile, that being; physical touch, therefore we must be in a position to feel the communication, such as the dog pulling on the leash while I am walking him. The dog’s communication conveys his intent or feeling toward something which has got his attention, be it animal, vegetable or mineral.
We breed dogs to develop certain innate features/traits. The Pit Bull and other dogs of like capacity were bred for the purpose of deterring threats by aggressive means. These traits remain in the dog today, although the average person having these dogs today, do not own or need them for the original purpose for breeding.
The need’ has turned to a desire.” The average owners are ignorant of and lack respect for the breeds capacity, training limits, and unreliability as regards to obedience. Does this make the Pit Bull a BAD DOG? NO! It makes them dog with traits, just like a sight hound verses a Scent hound. They are both dogs, but have capacities and limits that must be respected. Are there exceptions? YES.
An Obedient, reliable dog follows the handlers command, even though it does not want to. This means when there is a threat, or other stimulus which incites the dog to revert back to his “innate state” of survival; your “training” which the dog learned to trust, will surface and override his natural instincts to fight, flight, or chase. This type of training requires dedication, which I find the majority and average dog owners do not have.
In comparing various breeds of dogs, we must look at their purpose and capacity, much like one would compare guns for hunting or self protection.
For example; if there were a 44 magnum pistol, loaded, laying on a table….it is not dangerous!!! The gun does not think, interpret and react on its own as a dog does. A gun only becomes dangerous when someone picks it up, and is careless with it, or intentionally uses it,
The Pit Bull and other like dogs of like capacity in comparison to other dogs is (this may be over simplifying) a 44 magnum pistol; whereas the average dog is a 22 pistol. If the same surface of your shoulder is hit with a bullet from a 22 pistol, it is probably going to hurt, and may have residual adverse affect. If that same surface area is hit with a bullet from a 44 magnum; your shoulder will probably be destroyed. I am not an expert in guns, so perhaps you should do your own research.
Thinking along these same lines of potential affect of various dogs; I posed a question to myself. The law enforcement agencies use the fear factor of a growling snarling lunging dog. So why do the police not use Pit Bulls in their every day work? The police use other dogs, in high public profile, to support their law enforcement efforts, so why not the pit bull? A dog growling and lunging at the leash is a powerful image and certainly is a deterrent to any hostile approach to that officer. If it were a Pit bull; with my perception and understanding of that dog; my fear and concern would be much greater. The pit bull is rarely used because it isn’t anywhere near as reliable to obedience as the other breeds used in law enforcement. And let’s face it, I would not want to be in a crowd of people where a Pit Bull is on aggression leash and I am restricted from moving away from him.
In closing; Do a group of citizens with a vested interest; have the right to ask for protection of animals through legislation by restricting certain animals and where they may be housed and what materials and specification must be used for such housing? YES should animal owners be required to ensure their dogs remain on their property, and not place me and mine in peril? YES. Should Animal owners be held accountable for injury and mayhem their animals commit intentionally or unintentionally? YES
Rights of Americans” it seem are no longer “inalienable”, but must now be legislated. That is not the way it should be. We have enough legislation; however irresponsible, ignorant, and selfish people require or cause all of us to suffer more legislation. Therefore; we must be diligent and prudent in writing such legislation, and in requiring responsible ownership. Can we require owners of put bulls or like dogs of like capacity; to train their animals’ NO”, but those owners should suffer the consequences of their poor or lacking training or control of such dogs.
With every group of NEW” dog owners there comes ignorant, this will never change. But some owners recognize their responsibility and maintain control of and train the animals. However, I think there some that must eat Bowl of Stupid everyday………… because they and others like them keep missing the point. That point being….they, you, and I are responsible for any injury mayhem our dogs cause. And no matter whom you are, or how much money one may be awarded as a result of for an encounter with BIG DOGS…..there is no bringing back to live of a person; adult or child, family or stranger, or replacing an eye or scars, not to mention the fear the victim holds of other dogs, from that moment on.

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pranil September 22, 2011 - 9:14 am

i have indian mongrel puppy !i want to know that is this puppy would be good for my home or not?
he is of 3 months he is quite powerful ,obedient but became quite aggressive during nightplay and with non-veg food.i want to know some special abilites of these dogs. please reply early as soon as possible.

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Georgia taylor September 23, 2011 - 1:51 pm

I’ve had german shepherds all my life, and they’ve been great with the family and kids.. never once had a bad pup.

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Stella G Vidales October 2, 2011 - 8:45 pm

Pit Bulls are NOT naturally agressive! We owned one several years ago and she NEVER bit, chased or otherwise tried to harm anyone! Billie (our Pit Bull) would, of course bark, as would any dog, whenever strangers would approach, but she never jumped the fence to go at strangers. The only time she would get excited and WANT to jump the fence was when our sons (children back then) and their friends would wrestle in the front yard where she could see them. She wanted to join in the fun!

I would trust my 5 grandchildren (the youngest will celebrate his 1st birthday Oct. 20th, 2011) around a Pit Bull more than I would trust a Rottweiler, Doberman Pinscher or German Shepard. Now THOSE dogs, as beautiful as they are, are alot scarier to me than a Pit Bull ever would be! As a matter of fact, I’m waiting to be paired up with a Pit Bull as my service dog, as I am disabled! Now why would I put my grandchildren at risk if I didn’t trust the breed of dog that will be living with me for many years to come? Stop perpetuating the myth that Pit Bulls are dangerous! As the saying goes: “There are NO BAD Pit Bulls, just BAD OWNERS!!” You can take a newborn child and teach it to be mean and hateful and it will grow up that way. The same is true for Pit Bulls! They are NOT BORN mean & vicious, they’re MADE to be that way by their idiotic, hateful owners!

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best rap videos October 3, 2011 - 1:34 am

I got the course and was happy overall. I thought it was a bit light in a few areas but Rob definitely knows what he’s talking about and gives some quality advice.

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Smudge October 12, 2011 - 6:47 am

I’m probably going to contradict something else i have said, but i am very interested in this topic.

Let us relate dogs to humans. There are some crazy people in the world that are naturally aggressive, this is the same for dogs. You can take a dog and train it to fight, i know that. You can also get a dog you think will be fine and you turn around for a second and it has mauled your child. It comes down to instinct. A well trained dog may not bite their owner, but if the time comes that they feel threatened? You can bet the dog will either remain submissive or become the dominant one.

Every dog is an individual, owners will know this. It is unlikely that you will get two dogs that are the same. So how do we find out which one would be good for our family? You can look at the breed of dog, that will tell you a little bit about what the breed should be like. Now you look around for a good breeder. You learn that the aunty of your dog is a bit aggressive but the parents havent shown any aggression. You buy the dog, take it home, you don’t train it very well and it becomes the dominant one. The dog growls at you, you become scared, and finally it has taken over your house. Now you can blame it on the breed “Huskies are the worst breed ever because mine is really agressive and i don’t know why!” or you could admit it was your fault “I didn’t train my Husky as i was supposed to, it’s my fault.” Ok so what do you do with the dog? Get rid of it? Some people would get it put down, others would live with it, maybe take it to a trainer. Depends on the type of person you are.

People are still arguing about Pit Bull. Ok, a Pit Bull is a breed of dog. Dogs bite. So its safe to say that some people will be bitten by PIt Bulls. Did you know that when a Pit Bull is trained to fight, it is taught not to attack its owners? Or any human for that matter? It will attack other dogs, for sure, but not humans.

To sum it all up. Dogs are dogs, regardless of the breed. Some dogs are naturally agressive. Some aggresive dogs are due to training, most aren’t. I have probably contradicted myself in some way but really, who’s going to read this?

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pissedoff October 17, 2011 - 2:00 pm

why is it that the only information givin on pitbulls is that they were used for fighting. my little sisters and my friends children have always been able to ride theyre pitbulls around like ponys. lets see any other dog let a toddler do that. dont think so.

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Kyrine Wood October 17, 2011 - 6:45 pm

Possibly one of the most factually inaccurate articles I have ever read. Firstly, the Dalmatian was bred as a carriage dog to protect people whilst travelling (common knowledge) and, secondly, Karl Friederich Louis Dobermann was a tax collector and not a policeman – another well known fact to anyone who takes the time to at LEAST google information on breed history BEFORE writing such untruths. It is badly thought out articles containing substandard information that cause so much damage to dogs which should never be judged by breed alone but by individual behaviour which is a direct reflection of the handling and care they receive. Nowhere in this article do you refer to facts such as you are more likely to be bitten by a Cocker Spaniel than a Doberman Pinscher which, again, if you made the effort to research your information you would be well aware of.

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kayla October 18, 2011 - 8:29 pm

if were guna blame breed for the attacks we might as well put every single breed on that list. because any dog can bite if not trained properly. because. you need to teach your dogs right from wrong. dont go blaming the breed/dog blame the person that owns the dog there the ones trained it i work at a kennel and i get different types of dogs trying to bite me not just pit bulls. golden retrievers to and guess what there suppose to be friendly does too.
i worked at a animal control a few yrs back and most does that are viscous are golden retriever. so dont go blaming the breed for one dog mistake blame the owner

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Thargraves October 20, 2011 - 9:12 am

We have the sweetest Gator Pit in the world. She loves everyone and would never hurt someone intentionally. She is the biggest baby and absolutely adores my 9 year old son and 10 year old niece. We had to bring her inside because our female black lab kept attacking her. I really think it depends on the dog more then the breed.

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Pesa October 24, 2011 - 6:31 am

What about bull mastiff those ones can be aggressive and territorial too

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Corina October 24, 2011 - 1:35 pm

Thanks for the info on here but I disagree that the Pit Bull is the most aggresive. I have a dog, she’s half pit bull and one of the sweetest dogs ever! She’s a little protective and doesn’t like strange men if they’re wearing sunglasses but once she can see they’re eyes and smells them she’ll become the snuggle but that she is. And she is pretty good with other dogs, she’s not a fan of them but as long as they arn’t being aggresive twords her she wont freak out. Again thank you for your time with putting all of this together.

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David October 27, 2011 - 1:32 pm

I think pit bulls are the dogs of satan. They are strong and aggressive, which is fine for the most part, however, they are unpredictable at times and tend to suddenly attack for no apparent reason in some cases. This is why should should not keep a pit around children…you would feel the same way if you did a search on pit bull attacks and see what happens to a child when a pit tears into one of them.

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Vasant Kudva October 29, 2011 - 11:42 am

Holy Crap!That is the most absurd write up ever…Why would any body in his/her right senses categorise a St. Bernard, Boxer,Dalmation and a Chow chow as dangerous breed.While I quite disagree with some others in the list.
My family has been breeding dogs for over three generations and this was quite a hilarious read…please correct your knowledge quotient and make changes.

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nikita November 1, 2011 - 12:25 am

i see this dogs are relly powerfull. but i have a Rottweiler but he is very cute n i love him a lot. i love rottwilers a lot. i think we human make this dog powerfull.

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ruth November 2, 2011 - 7:55 pm

what the crap were you smoking when u wrote this saint banards are one of the most gentle dogs EVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Hanno November 4, 2011 - 4:47 pm

I think if you have a well bred boerboel and learn him to be aggressive it would be the most dangerous by far, but most boerboel’s are only guard dogs and if brought up right will only attack when they or their masters are in danger.

Here you can find a picture of a “real” boerboel

http://dogsbreed.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Boerboel.png

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Hanno November 4, 2011 - 5:05 pm

Sorry about the late post but here is another indicator of boerboel power

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100304194249AAXsEGZ

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Brad November 6, 2011 - 12:09 am

U forgot the most dangerous other then the one attacking at a particular time u forgot the thunder mt dog 200lbs of furry anger used in Russia to guard prisoners

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IbY November 8, 2011 - 9:28 am

u forgot th turkish sheaperd

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Ghetto Queen November 9, 2011 - 9:59 am

i think all dogs are dangerous and should be “PUT DOWN.” Little dogs? You think they are good? NOOOOOOO. they bite your ankles like little bones. next little dog i see will be kicked to the max. watch out for flying dogs.

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Jessi November 10, 2011 - 5:02 pm

The Pit Bull was not bred for FIGHTING in the beginning. Misinformation. It was bred for bull baiting, and ratting. THEN Dog fighting. The Akita is similar, bred for hunting boar and black bear, then honed in on its DOG fighting skills.

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Troy Tilbury November 11, 2011 - 2:06 pm

The Pit Bull was not bred strictly for fighting it was bred as a hunting and catch dog for wild cattle and wild pigs. It dissapointing that they get a bad wrap because of the people that raise them for fighting out weigh the people that have them as loving pets. My dad and stepmother have one and my 3 year old nephew uses to sleep on him, they are best friends. Another friend of mine has one named Happy and she would rather fall asleep on you like a baby than me aggressive. DOORE RESEARCH AND FIND OUT FOR YOURSELF, IT’S NOT JUST PITS THAT ATTACK PEOPLE!

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DogLover November 14, 2011 - 9:19 pm

Oh my goodness! This is so cool! I love learning about dog breeds and information in general, this is just sweet stuff. I like reading the comments too. Man, you guys are smart!

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Ray November 20, 2011 - 1:23 pm

Well your list is kind of ignorant to the history of dogs. Rotties were not bred as guardians. They were drover and draft animals used to herd and transport goods. Also Pit bull is not a breed, but rather a group of breeds which includes several dogs that resemble the American Pit bull terriers.

Breeds such as..
The American Staffordshire Terrier
The American Bully
The American Bulldog
The Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Boxer mixes that resemble “pit bulls” and even
Ordinary short haired mutts can all be mistaken as the American Pit Bull Terrier and when they do something bad it looks bad on a breed that had nothing to do with it.

. There is only one American Pit Bull terrier and they were NOT originally bred for dog fighting. Instead they were bred as bull baiters and herding dogs. They and staffordshire bull terriers were known as the “nanny dogs” because of their affinity for children. Lately the American Bully has been tarnishing their reputation because they are bred to be aggressive by idiots looking for a dick extension. These dogs are NOT American Pit Bull Terriers and I wish people would stop mistaking them as such.Today the primary jobs of the American Pit Bull Terrier include catching wild animals and for the vicious blood sport of dog fighting.

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